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Biographies Index


Speakers



David Z. Albert



Andreas J. Albrecht



Jeffery Bub



David Deutsch



Hilary Greaves



James B. Hartle



John Hawthorne



Tim Maudlin



Wayne Myrvold



Itamar Pitowsky



Simon Saunders



Lev Vaidman



Antony Valentini



David Wallace





Commentators



Guido Bacciagaluppi



Harvey Brown



Jeremy Butterfield



Robert Geroch



Meir Hemmo



Michel Janssen



Adrian Kent



James Ladyman



Christoph Lehner



Peter Lewis



Barry Loewer



David Papineau



Oliver Pooley



Alastair Rae



Tony Sudbery



Paul Tappenden



Christopher Timpson



Tim Williamson




Conference Manager



Peter Taylor





Biographies

This page gives you background and some pictures of the attendees and your principal organiser contacts at the Conference.

Speakers

David Z. Albert

David Z. Albert is the Frederick E. Woodbridge Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University and the Director of the M.A. Program in the Philosophical Foundations of Physics. His areas of specialisation are the philosophical problems of modern physics, philosophy of quantum mechanics, philosophy of time and space, and the philosophy of science. He is the author of Quantum Mechanics and Experience, and Time and Chance.

Andreas J. Albrecht

Andreas AlbrechtAndreas J. Albrecht is a Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of California, Davis, and a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Institute of Physics (UK). His focus is on the field of Cosmology and issues surrounding the formation and evolution of the Universe. His specific research problems currently include: fundamental issues with the theory of cosmic inflation, the formation of cosmic structure, and searching for the understanding of the "dark energy" that currently suggests is accelerating the Universe. This recent work includes serving on the "Dark Energy Task Force" to develop the US observational program to study the cosmic acceleration.

Jeffrey Bub

Jeffrey BubJeffrey Bub is a Distinguished Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Maryland and on the Committee for Philosophy and the Sciences. Rooted in the foundations of physics, his current interests are in the rapidly developing fields of quantum computation, quantum cryptography, and especially quantum information: ‘how information is stored, how it can be moved around, what you can do about it, and what this tells us about the quantum world.’ He is the author of The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and Interpreting the Quantum World, which won the Lakatos Award in 1998.

David Deutsch

David DeutschDavid Deutsch is an associate of the Department of Atomic and Laser physics at the Centre for Quantum Computation, University of Oxford. He is one of the founders of the field of quantum computing and a long-standing proponent of the multiverse interpretation of quantum mechanics, as set out in his book The Fabric of Reality. He was the recipient of the Dirac Prize of the Institute of Physics in 1998 and the Edge of Computation Science Prize in 2005, and is currently working on a book entitled The Beginning of Infinity.

Hilary Greaves

Hilary GreavesHilary Greaves is completing her Ph.D in the Department of Philosophy at Rutgers University and is Junior Research Fellow at Merton College, University of Oxford, in philosophy of physics. She is the author of a number of papers in confirmation theory and Bayesian epistemology, most of them focused explicitly on the Everett interpretation. Her most recent is “On the Everettian problem’, published in History and Philosophy in Modern Physics.

James B. Hartle

James HartleJames B. Hartle is a Research Professor of Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His scientific work is concerned with the application of Einstein's theory of gravity to realistic astrophysical situations, especially cosmology. He has contributed usefully to the understanding of gravitational waves, relativistic stars, and black holes. His current interest is in understanding the quantum origin of the universe and the generalizations of quantum mechanics necessary for that. He is a member of the US National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a founder and past director of the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Santa Barbara.

John Hawthorne

John HawthorneJohn Hawthorne is the Waynflete Professor of Metaphysical Philosophy at Magdalen College, University of Oxford. His research interests include metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, and early modern philosophy. His most recent book is Metaphysical Essays, 2006. [website]

Tim Maudlin

Tim MaudlinTim Maudlin is Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Rutgers University. His areas of research include the philosophy of science, philosophy of physics, and metaphysics. He is the author of Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Intimations of Modern Physics and Truth and Paradox: Solving the Riddles.

Wayne C. Myrvold

Wayne MyrvoldWayne C. Myrvold is Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Talbot College, University of Western Ontario, and is Associate Member of the Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics, Waterloo. His work is chiefly concerned with the philosophy of physics and the interpretation of quantum mechanics, but he has also published in confirmation theory, Bayesian epistemology, and the philosophy of biology. His recent publications include “Modal Interpretations and Relativity” and “Relativistic Quantum Becoming.”

Itamar Pitowsky

Itamar PitowskyItamar Pitowsky is a Professor in t he Philosophy Department and The Program for the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. His research is in philosophy of physics. He has contributed extensively to the foundations of quantum mechanics. In his monograph, Quantum Probability, Quantum Logic , he recast the Bell inequalities as general theorems about classical probability. He is currently working in information-theoretic approaches to quantum mechanics. [website]

Simon Saunders

Simon SaundersSimon Saunders is Reader in the Philosophy of Physics and Fellow of Linacre College at the University of Oxford. He has worked in the foundations of quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, symmetries, and thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. He was an early proponent of the view of branching in the Everett interpretation as an ‘effective’ process based on decoherence. His most recent work include ‘On the explanation of quantum statistics’ and (with D. Wallace) ‘Branching and uncertainty’. [website]

Lev Vaidman

Lev VaidmanLev Vaidman is a professor of physics at Tel-Aviv University. His scientific interests are Foundations of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Information. His main achievements include Continuous-Variables Teleportation, Weak Measurements (with Yakir Aharonov), Interaction-free Measurements (with Avshalom Elitzur), and Cryptography with Orthogonal States (with Lior Goldenberg). For a long time he is one of the strongest proponents of the Everett Interpretation as can be seen from his SEP entry The Many-Worlds Interpretation. [website]

Antony Valentini

Antony ValentiniAntony Valentini is a Visiting Professor at the Centre de Physique Théorique de Luminy, Université de la Méditerranée, Marseilles, and a member of the Foundational Questions Institute. His research focuses on the possible role of hidden variables in quantum theory and cosmology --- in particular, in the very early universe (including inflationary cosmology), in quantum information and computation, and in the physics of black holes. His research interests also include the history and philosophy of modern physics: he is co-author (with G. Bacciagaluppi) of Quantum Theory at the Crossroads: Reconsidering the 1927 Solvay Conference (CUP, forthcoming, and quant-ph/0609184). He is the principal exponent of the 'quantum nonequilibrium' hypothesis, according to which quantum theory is not fundamental but merely describes a statistical equilibrium state, which the universe happens to be in at the present time. Recent papers include 'Astrophysical and Cosmological Tests of Quantum Theory', J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 40, 3285-3303 (2007) [ hep-th/0610032]. He is completing a book (also to be published by CUP) that re-examines modern physics and cosmology from a pilot-wave and general hidden-variables viewpoint.

David Wallace

David WallaceDavid Wallace is Fellow in Philosophy of Balliol College, University of Oxford. His research has concentrated on the interpretation of quantum mechanics, and in particular on the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics, although he has also worked on the foundations of statistical mechanics and of quantum field theory. He is co-author (with D. Deutsch) of the decision-theory argument for quantum probability and of a number of influential papers on the Everett interpretation.

Commentators

Guido Bacciagaluppi

Guido BacciagaluppiGuido Bacciagaluppi is a philosopher of physics at the Centre for Time, University of Sydney. He works on the foundations of quantum mechanics and is a principal contributor to modal interpretations of quantum mechanics. He has just completed (with A. Valentini) an English translation of and commentary on the Proceedings of the Fifth Solvay Congress of 1927.

Harvey Brown

Harvey BrownHarvey Brown is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford and Fellow of Wolfson College. His has published widely in the foundations of quantum mechanics, relativity theory, and thermal physics. He is the author of Physical Relativity: Space-time structure from a dynamical perspective, for which he was co-winner of the 2006 Lakatos prize in philosophy of science.

Jeremy Butterfield

Jeremy ButterfieldJeremy Butterfield is a Senior Research Fellow at Trinity College, University of Cambridge . He has published widely in the philosophy of space-time, and in the foundations of quantum mechanics and classical mechanics. His most recent book (co-edited with J. Earman) is A Handbook of Philosophy of Physics.

Robert Geroch

Robert GerochRobert Geroch is Professor of Physics at the University of Chicago. His research interests lie in relativity and quantum mechanics. He is the author of General Relativity From A to B.

Meir Hemmo

Meir HemmoMeir Hemmo is Professor in the Philosophy Department at the University of Haifa. His main research areas are philosophy of modern physics, philosophy of science, probability and metaphysics.

Michel Janssen

Michel JanssenMichel Janssen is a Professor at the Center for Philosophy of Science at the University of Minnesota. He is a regular visitor at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin. His research area is the history of modern physics, particularly the history of relativity theory.

Adrian Kent

Adrian Kent is Reader in Quantum Physics at the Centre for Quantum Computation, DAMTP, University of Cambridge. His research interests include quantum information theory, quantum cryptography, quantum nonlocality and the foundations of quantum theory. Along with Jonathan Barrett and David Wallace, he is organizing "Many Worlds at 50" a meeting taking place at Perimeter Institute in September 2007, which will attempt to identify the strongest arguments for and against many-worlds interpretations in the light of recent research.

James Ladyman

James Ladyman is Reader in Philosophy at the University of Bristol. His research interests are primarily in philosophy of science, and especially in constructive empiricism and structural realism. He is the author of Understanding Philosophy of Science, which received a Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award, and has just completed (with D. Ross, D. Spurrett and J. Collier) Everything Must Go: Metaphysics Naturalized . He is the recepient of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Philosophy and Ethics.

Christoph Lehner

Christoph LehnerChristoph Lehner is a Research Scholar at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, and coordinator of the research project on history and foundations of quantum physics. He got his Ph.D. from Stanford with a dissertation about the Everett interpretation and has worked at the Einstein Papers project. Recently, he was one of the organizers of the 2005 exhibition "Albert Einstein, Engineer of the Universe." Right now, he is working on the history of wave mechanics and on a Cambridge Companion to Albert Einstein.

Peter Lewis

Peter LewisPeter Lewis is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Miami. His research interests are in philosophy of science, especially philosophy of physics, scientific realism and scientific methodology. He has published articles on the foundations of quantum mechanics and on scientific realism.

Barry Loewer

Barry LoewerBarry Loewer is a Professor and chair of the Department of Philosophy at Rutgers University and is Director of the Rutgers Center for Philosophy and the Sciences. His areas of research include the philosophy of science, philosophy of physics, the philosophy of mind, metaphysics, and the philosophical logic. He has published articles on Bohemian mechanics, GRW, and on the foundations of Stat Mech (may with D. Albert) and is the author of Meaning in Mind (with George Rey Blackwell), and the creator (with D. Albert) of the ‘many-minds’ interpretation of quantum mechanics.

David Papineau

David PapineauDavid Papineau is Professor of Philosophy of Science at King's College London. His areas of focus are epistemology, philosophy of science, and philosophy of mind. He is currentlyworking on consciousness, practical reasoning, and the evolution of cognition more generally. His recent books include Thinking about Consciousness and The Roots of Reason: Philosophical Essays on Rationality, Evolution and Probability.

Oliver Pooley

Oliver PooleyOliver Pooley is a Fellow in Philosophy of Oriel College, University of Oxford. His primary area of research is in the philosophy of physics, where he is especially interested in topics that overlap with metaphysics and the philosophy of language. He has written influential articles on Mach’s principle in special and general relativity and on relationist approaches to mirror-symmetry. He is currently completing a book on spacetime.

Alastair Rae

Alastair Rae is a Reader in Quantum Physics at the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Birmingham until he retired in 2003. He is the author of Quantum Physics: Reality or Illusion?, Quantum Mechanics (an undergraduate text) and Quantum Physics: a Beginner’s Guide.

Tony Sudbery

Tony SudberyTony Sudbery is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics, University of York. His areas of interest are quantum information theory, foundations of quantum mechanics, and exceptional Lie algebras. Recent articles inlcude "Why Am I Me?" (quant-ph/00011084) and "Alice and Bob Get Away With It" (physics/0606186) .

Paul Tappenden

Paul TappendenPaul Tappenden obtained his Ph.D. from the Department of Philosophy, Kings College, London. His research interests lie in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics. His most recent article is 'Saunders and Wallace on Everett and Lewis'.

Christopher Timpson

Christopher TimpsonChristopher Timpson is currently a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Leeds. He will be joining Oxford faculty in September 2007. His research interests are in the philosophy of physics, especially quantum mechanics and quantum information theory, philosophy of science, and philosophy of mind and language. Recent publications include “The Grammar of Teleportation” and (with H. R. Brown) of “Why Special Relativity Should not be a Template for a Fundamental Reformulation of Quantum Mechanics”. His work on quantum information theory will shortly be forthcoming with an Oxford University Press monograph Quantum Information Theory and the Foundations of Quantum Mechanics.

Tim Williamson

Tim WilliamsonTim Williamson is the Wykeham Professor of Logic at the University of Oxford, and Fellow of New College, Oxford. His main research interests are in philosophical logic, philosophy of language, epistemology and metaphysics. He is the author of Vagueness, Knowledge and Its Limits and the forthcoming The Philosophy of Philosophy . He was this year elected Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Conference Manager

Peter Taylor

Peter TaylorPeter Taylor has spent the last 25 years working in the Lloyd's insurance market where he has managed IT and loss modelling departments and led and participated in many projects. He has been a director of insurance broking and underwriting companies and market organisations, and is currently the Deputy Chairman of the Lighthill Risk Network, a non-profit organisation with a mission of bringing together the business and scientific communities for their mutual benefit. Peter has a long-standing interest in all aspects of risk, whether in insurance or in science generally, and has a particular background in the foundations of quantum theory for which he was awarded his D Phil at Oxford.