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Last updated 10 March 2014

Disclaimer: While all efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information included here, please check with the organisers of an event before making any special arrangements to attend.


  • Lectures and seminars in Oxford, Cambridge, London, Edinburgh & elsewhere
  • Conferences (in chronological order)
  • Book Fairs

  • Lectures and Seminars: Oxford

    Annual D.F. McKenzie lecture (2014)
    20 February 2014 - 5pm
    Lecture Theatre 2, English Faculty, St Cross Building, Oxford

    Dr William Noel (University of Pennsylvania): Bibliography in bits: The study of books in the twenty-first century

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    James P.R. Lyell Lectures in Bibliography (2013)
    TS Eliot Lecture Theatre, Merton College, Oxford
    Tuesday and Thursday - 5pm

    Aspects of Late-Medieval English Autograph Writings
    Professor Richard Beadle (Cambridge)

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    Lowe Lectures (2014)[New!]
    MBI Al-Jaber Auditorium, Corpus Christi College, Oxford
    Various - 5pm

    Dr Erik Kwakkel: The Birth of Gothic Script

    Further details here: http://www.hum.leiden.edu/lucas/turning-over-a-new-leaf/news/lowelectures.html

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    Oxford Bibliographical Society (2013-14)
    Mondays - 5.15pm

    Members may bring guests to any meeting.

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    Magdalen Library Seminar
    27 February 2013 - 5.30pm
    Magdalen College Summer Common Room, Oxford

    Dr Tom Freeman on The Making of John Foxe's Book of Martyrs

    Dr Tom Freeman is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Essex. He was the Research Officer of the British Academy John Foxe Project. He is the co-author of Religion and the Book in Early Modern England: The making of Foxe's 'Book of Martyrs' (Cambridge 2011) and numerous articles on many aspects of Foxe and his martyrology.

    After the talk there will be refreshments and a chance to examine close up the three editions owned by Magdalen College: the first two editions (1563 and 1570), which were presented to the College by Foxe himself, as well as the copiously illustrated edition of 1631, which the College recently acquired. This term's Magdalen College Library & Archives exhibition, on medical manuscripts, early printed books, & archival material, will also be available for viewing.

    The seminars are free and open to all. Refreshments will be provided.

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    Seminar on the History of the Book 1450-1800 (2013)
    Wharton Room, All Souls College, Oxford
    Fridays - 2.15pm

    Convener: Professor I.W.F. Maclean

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    Lecture and Library Tour at St John's
    15 April 2013 - 2-5pm
    St John's College Oxford

    Dr. Christopher Stray
    Oxford University Press's Classical and Educational Publishing in the 19th Century: Culture and Commerce

    Followed by a tour of the library at St John's College Oxford. Refreshments will be served.

    Dr. Stray is Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Classics at Swansea University, as well as Senior Research Fellow in the Institute of Classical Studies at the University of London.

    Hosted by the Library & Information History Group. The event is free, but numbers are limited. Please RSVP by 10 April to Renae Satterley at: r.satterley@middletemple.org.uk or on 020 7427 4830.

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    Astor Fund Visiting Lectureship 2013
    Oxford

    Professor Mark Rose, University of California, Santa Barbara

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    The language of parchment: Learning about the history of medieval manuscripts with the help of visual assessment of parchment
    25 June 2013 - 2-3.15pm, 3.30-5pm
    Lecture Room, Pitt Rivers Museum, Oxford

    Tuesday 25th June 2013 Part I: 14.00 – 15.15 Part II: 15.30 – 17.00

    Drawing on his huge bank of knowledge and experience in handling and studying parchment manuscripts, Jiří Vnouček will describe the most effective methods and tools employed to gain a sound and informative description of parchment as a support and the insights that such visual analysis can provide in terms of its origin and manufacture. Despite fast moving advances in the information we can now gain, such as the exact DNA of the animal, it is still the case that relatively simple visual examination can yield information that will enrich our knowledge not only about the parchment but about the whole production of manuscripts and their history.

    The study of parchment provides essential information for the understanding of any manuscript whose primary support is made from animal skin and the best results will be obtained especially by interdisciplinary research involving historians, codicologists and researchers in manuscripts, who will combine their knowledge with that of experts in other fields such as archaeology, biology, conservation and forensic science.

    The lecture will be presented by Jiří Vnouček, who has almost 30 years experience in the conservation of paper, parchment and bookbindings. Having been head of Conservation at the National Library in Prague, he currently works for the Royal Library in Copenhagen. For the past 15 years his focus has been upon the study of parchment, an interest that lead him to write his MA thesis in 2010 entitled 'Defects and Damage in Parchment Manuscripts.'

    This lecture is presented by the Bodleian Libraries and the Oxford Colleges Conservation Consortium

    Registration is essential and places are limited: email bookcentre@bodleian.ox.ac.uk

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    English Humanist Scripts up to c. 1509 [lectures]
    Room 10, Examination Schools, High Street, Oxford
    Thursdays - 5pm

    Michaelmas Term, weeks 1 – 6 [October 17 to November 21, 2013]
    Dr David Rundle

    A series of lectures supported by the Lyell Fund

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    Bodleian Masterclasses: Early modern books and libraries
    Group Study Room, Radcliffe Science Library
    Mondays - 2.15-3.45pm

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    Bodleian Masterclasses: Medieval manuscripts and palaeography
    Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Room, South Parks Road, Oxford
    Mondays - 2.15-3.45pm

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    Colin Franklin Prize for Book Collecting
    28 October 2013 - 5pm
    Convocation House, Bodleian Library

    Deadline for submissions: 20 January 2014

    The Centre for the Study of the Book offers a prize to an under-graduate or post-graduate student of the University of Oxford, recognizing discrimination and judgment in the formation of a collection of books on a particular topic or representing particular bibliographic features. For further information and the rules of the contest, see: www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/csb

    All are welcome to a presentation on historic collections, introducing the contest

    Brooke Palmieri (UCL): Collectanomics: the impact of book collecting on our evaluation of books

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    Future of Editing
    Taylor Institution, St Giles , OX1 3NA
    Fridays - 5pm-6pm

    We are delighted to announce seminars by Dr Brett D. Hirsch (University of Western Australia) and Professor Greg Walker (University of Edinburgh), our first speakers in a new, interdisciplinary series on the future of editing.

    The seminars are free, and open to all. Please join us for drinks afterwards.

    http://bdlssblog.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/archives/487
    For more information, please contact Pip Willcox: pip.willcox@bodleian.ox.ac.uk.

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    William Gray and his Books[New!]
    13 March 2014 - 5pm
    Lecture Room 23, Balliol College, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BJ

    Dr Katherine Zieman: William Gray and his Books (Oliver Smithies Lecture)

    Dr Katherine Zieman, formerly Assistant Professor of English and Medieval Studies at Notre Dame University, is the Oliver Smithies Lecturer at Balliol for Hilary Term 2014. William Gray was the single most important donor (by far) to Balliol's 15th century library. More than half the surviving library of medieval Balliol came from Gray.

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    Lecture: 'Once upon a time there were three Georges': Infringement of 'copyright' in the 1520s[New!]
    21 May 2014 - 5pm
    T.S. Eliot Lecture Theatre, Merton College, Oxford

    'Once upon a time there were three Georges': Infringement of 'copyright' in the 1520s
    Peter W.M. Blayney, author of The Stationers' Company and the Printers of London, 1501-1557 (Cambridge University Press, 2013)

    Presented by Merton History of the Book Group in cooperation with the Bodleian Libraries Centre for the Study of the Book

    All welcome.

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    Lectures and Seminars: Cambridge

    Cambridge Bibliographical Society (2013-14)
    Milstein Seminar Rooms, University Library, Cambridge
    Wednesdays - 5pm

    Milstein Seminar Rooms, Cambridge University Library, 5:00 pm (except where noted). Tea from 4:30 pm before the lectures.

    Tea will be served at 4.30pm before the lectures

    For further details, please contact the Hon. Secretary, Cambridge Bibliographical Society, The University Library, Cambridge CB3 9DR

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    Sandars lectures (2014)[New!]
    Milstein Seminar Rooms, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge
    Wednesdays - 5pm

    The Lectures entitled Samuel Sandars as Collector of Illuminated Manuscripts will be delivered by Professor Nigel Morgan, Emeritus Honorary Professor of the History of Art, University of Cambridge at 5pm in the Milstein Seminar Rooms, Cambridge University Library, Cambridge as follows:
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    Cambridge Incunabula Masterclasses
    Cambridge University Library
    Tuesdays and Thursdays afternoons

    During the summer holidays Cambridge University Library will be holding three masterclasses as part of the Incunabula Project. With the help of treasures from the incunabula collection in the University Library, Professor Lilian Armstrong, Doctor Falk Eisermann, and Professor William Sherman will respectively illustrate the development of Venetian book ornamentation in the late 15th and early 16th century, the centrality of the Gesamtkatalog der Wiegendrucke Database to bibliographical research and/or cataloguing projects, and the significance of contemporary readers’ interventions and additions to their books.

    Attendance will be limited in order to allow all attendees a chance to see the books under discussion up close, and to participate in the discussion.

    To book your place, please email incunabula@lib.cam.ac.uk

    More details: https://inc.blog.lib.cam.ac.uk/?p=2572

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    Lectures and Seminars: London

    Panizzi Lectures (2013-14)
    Conference Centre, British Library, 96 Euston Road, NW1 2DB
    6.30-7.30pm

    Censors at Work: Bourbon France, Imperialist India and Communist East Germany.

    A series of three lectures by Professor Robert Darnton, Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and Director of theUniversity Library at Harvard. Professor Darnton’s latest books are The Case for Books (2009), The Devil in the Holy Water, or The Art of Slander in France from Louis XIV to Napoleon (2010), and Poetry and the Police: Communication Networks in Eighteenth-Century Paris (2010).

    Free Admission. Please note that these events are not ticketed and seats will be allocated on the night on a first come, first served basis.

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    Bibliographical Society (2013-14)
    Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE
    Tuesdays - 5.30pm

    Meetings will be held at the Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE, beginning at 5.30 p.m. Tea will be served at 5.00 p.m. Members are welcome to bring guests, both to meetings and to the tea beforehand.

    Meetings will be held at the Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE, beginning at 5.30 p.m.

    Tea will be served at 5.00 p.m. Members are welcome to bring guests, both to meetings and to the tea beforehand.

    The AGM will take place at 5.30pm at at the Society of Antiquaries, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London W1J 0BE. The AGM will not be preceded by tea, but refreshments will be served after the meeting.

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    Seminar on the History of Libraries (2013-14)
    Senate House, Malet St., London WC1E 7HU (except where noted)
    Tuesdays - 5.30pm-7.30pm

    A series of research seminars, which are freely open for anyone to attend, has been organized by the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London.

    Venue: Most seminars take place in Senate House, Malet St., London WC1E 7HU, but a number have been arranged elsewhere (see below).

    Meetings will take place monthly during term-time on Tuesdays at 5.30 p.m., usually in the Senate Room on the first floor of Senate House. Changes to room allocations will be displayed on the website of the Institute of English Studies.

    Seminar convenors: Giles Mandelbrote (Lambeth Palace Library); Dr. Keith A. Manley (National Trust); Professor Simon Eliot (Institute of English Studies); Professor Isabel Rivers (Queen Mary).

    The seminars are jointly sponsored by the Institute of English Studies, the Institute of Historical Research, and the Library & Information History Group of CILIP.

    A number of seminar podcasts will be found on the website of the Institute of Historical Research at https://historyspot.org.uk/podcasts/history-libraries, including talks given during the last session by Alistair Black, Mark Purcell, Peter Hoare, and Geoffrey Little.

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    Seminar Series on Book Collecting 2013
    University of London's Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU
    Tuesday - 6-7.30pm

    Run by the Institute of English Studies and the Rare Book Society, these seminars are aimed at a broad audience including book collectors, book dealers, historians of all kinds, librarians, indeed anyone with an interest in collecting any sort of text from the sixth former to the retired professor. The atmosphere will be informal, as will the presentations.

    The sessions will run at Senate House from 6.00 to 7.30 pm, usually on the second Tuesday of the month. All are welcome.

    If you would like to attend any of these sessions please email Jon Millington (jon.millington@sas.ac.uk) in advance. For further information see the ABA website: http://www.aba.org.uk/seminars

    Website: http://events.sas.ac.uk/ies/seminars/358/Book+Collecting+Seminar+Series

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    Documents of Shakespearean Performance: Stage, Page, and Manuscript in Early Modern England
    Room 234, Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London
    Mondays - 5.30-7.30

    The Open University Book History Research Group, in partnership with the Institute of English Studies, is pleased to announce its next seminar series: Documents of Shakespearean Performance: Stage, Page, and Manuscript in Early Modern England. This season of nine seminars will run from October 2012 until February 2013.

    Attendance is free and all are warmly invited to attend.

    Since the publication of Tiffany Stern’s ground-breaking Shakespeare in Parts (2007) and Documents of Performance in Early Modern England (2009), the question of how Shakespeare’s plays were transmitted from manuscript to print has re-emerged as central to discussions of Shakespeare and the printed book. These seminars will feature leading and emerging scholars in Shakespeare studies and focus attention on the impact that the “new” theatre history has had on how we now understand the origins and histories of early printed play texts.

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    The Hilda Hulme Memorial Lecture
    2 July 2013 - 6pm
    Chancellor’s Hall, Senate House, University of London

    'Shakespeare His Contemporaries': Exploring Early Modern Drama in a Digital Environment
    Professor Martin Mueller (Professor emeritus of English and Classics, Northwestern University, Illinois)

    Students of Early Modern Drama will occasionally look at the 'original' text (if there is such a thing), but they will more often work with surrogates, partly because that is all they can get, but also because the surrogate's query potential may in some respects exceed that of the original: given unlimited access to a Shakespeare Folio I may for many purposes prefer to consult the Riverside Shakespeare. By the end of this decade a young person's first encounter with an Early Modern play is likely to be mediated through some digital tablet. What is the query potential of the digital surrogate, and what does it take to maximize it for 'the greate variety of readers, from the most able to him that can but spell,' to use the charming language of Shakespeare's first editors? This talk will focus on three interlocking aspects of this question: 1) curation and exploration as flip sides of the coin of working with digital data, 2) the potential for corpus-wide analysis or more extensive and rapid forms of contextualization, and 3) the promise of the digital medium to support collaboration and let individuals with different interests and talents contribute to the task of improving the texts over time. There are about 500 digital versions of plays by Shakespeare's contemporaries, and many of them could do with quite a bit of improvement.

    Free and open to the public, and followed by a wine reception. If you would like to attend please email: IESEvents@sas.ac.uk

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    Paper, Pen and Ink: Manuscript Cultures in Early Modern England
    The Institute of English Studies, University of London, Senate House, Room 234, London
    Mondays - 5.30-7.00pm

    This seminar series explores the rich variety of writing in manuscript that took place in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Each paper opens a window onto a different kind of manuscript activity - from the writing of poetry to the compilation of parish registers, from amateur and professional musicians’ use of lute-books to the note-taking strategies of university students - and assesses both its material processes and its broader cultural roles. As well as looking at the details of individual manuscripts (including previously unstudied material) and excavating the norms of a wide variety of different manuscript genres, speakers will provide new perspectives on topics such as the the history of manuscript studies, assumptions about the nature of ‘manuscript culture’ and ‘print culture’, the relationship between manuscripts and the ‘material turn’ in early modern studies and the challenges of editing early modern manuscripts. Please contact the organiser,
    Dr Jonathan Gibson, Lecturer in the Department of English, for further information about the series

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    Dissenting Studies Seminar Series (paper)
    8 January 2014 - 5.15-6.45pm
    Lecture Hall, Dr Williams's Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR

    Henry Crabb Robinson and the Dissenters: His Reading in Colchester 1790-95
    Jane Giscombe (Dr Williams’s Library, London)

    Abstract: In this paper I wish to examine the claim of the mature Robinson that in Colchester when he was aged between 14 and 20 years old he ‘learned nothing’. In 1844 Henry Crabb Robinson began to write his reminiscences, intending them for posterity. He wrote in a clear hand, set out in well-spaced lines. To assist his memory of the five years he spent as an attorney’s clerk in Colchester, he relied on his letters and pocket books written before he went to Germany in 1800 and the papers of his brother Thomas: ‘From these I will extract the few facts I wish not entirely to forget’. Of the 11,600 folios used to cover 68 years of Robinson’s life, only a tiny minority were devoted to the years 1790-95. I shall argue that Robinson’s pocketbooks and letters from the Colchester years nevertheless show that his experiences there were fundamental to his later development. At this formative time Robinson laid down the groundwork for a lifetime’s reading. In this paper I shall scrutinize his dismissal of William Francis, for whom he clerked in Colchester, and other dissenters who provided books, shared ideas and helped Robinson set up patterns that would inform his future interests. That this seminal reading took place among and was encouraged by dissenters from Baptist, Presbyterian and Independent backgrounds, and both by men and women of a variety of ages, is evident. Yet Robinson later belittled the majority of these people who shared their lives, their homes and, in particular, their books with him.'

    Part of the Dissenting Studies Seminar Series: the seminar will meet monthly on Wednesdays from January to July (excepting May) from 5.15 to 6.45 pm in the Lecture Hall, Dr Williams's Library, 14 Gordon Square, London WC1H 0AR. All are welcome. Those with an interest in Dr Williams’s Library and its collections and in the history of Protestant dissent are especially invited to attend.

    Website: http://www.english.qmul.ac.uk/drwilliams/events/current.html

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    Lectures and Seminars: Edinburgh

    Edinburgh Bibliographical Society (2012-13)
    National Library of Scotland, George IV Bridge, Edinburgh and Quaker Meeting House, 7 Victoria Terrace, Edinburgh EH1 2JL
    Thursdays - 5.45pm (except where noted)

    The Edinburgh Bibliographical, Society, founded 1890, promotes the study of books and manuscripts of any date, particularly Scottish, and prints bibliographical work in its Transactions and as Occasional Publications.

    Society website: http://www.edinburghbibliographicalsociety.org.uk/

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    Lectures and Seminars: Elsewhere

    Seminar by Nicolas Barker
    15 May 2013 - 4.30-6pm (preceded by tea from 4.00pm)
    Brotherton Room, Brotherton Library, University of Leeds

    The Centre for the Comparative History of Print, University of Leeds (UK), is pleased to announce the following seminar, organized in conjunction with the Brotherton Library, University of Leeds:

    Nicolas Barker FBA: The Making of 'Printing and the Mind of Man'

    This seminar by will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the groundbreaking exhibition, 'Printing and the Mind of Man', held at the British Museum and Earls' Court in connection with the 1963 International Printing Machinery and Allied Trades Exhibition (IPEX).

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    Archives and Texts seminar[New!]
    Humss Room 127, University of Reading
    Mondays - 5pm

    All welcome!

    http://archivesandtexts.wordpress.com/

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    Visit to the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland (CILIP's Library & Information History Group)
    12 July 2013 - 2.30-3.30pm
    100 Renfrew Street, Glasgow G2 3DB

    Scottish cultural history as illustrated by musical song collections , a talk by Karen McAulay, Music and Academic Services Librarian will be followed by a tour of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Library and Archives. The tour of the Archives will be led by Stuart Harris-Logan.

    This is a free event, but please RSVP to Renae Satterley by 8 July: r.satterley@middletemple.org.uk

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    Cranston Lecture 2013
    21 October 2013 - 7.30pm for 8pm
    St Mary's Church Hall, Chart Lane, Reigate

    In aid of the funds of the Cranston Library (1701–2012), the Trustees invite you to attend The Cranston Lecture 2013:

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    Conferences
    (in chronological order)

    The Production and Circulation of Printed Books in the Occident and Orient from the Accession of the Tang Dynasty (c.618) to the First Industrial Revolution
    14 - 15 February 2013
    The British Academy, 10-11 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AH

    This conference aims to open the conversation between economic historians and historians of the book and stimulate publications and research in a truly global history of knowledge formation from the Tang dynasty to the Industrial Revolution. It will provide a timely opportunity and forum for reviewing the debate on economic divergence between occident and orient after more than twelve years of debate and feed suggestions into the now rapidly growing field of global history. As an interdisciplinary conference linked to more than three decades of widespread research on the history of the book it should interest scholars in the fields of history, economics, law, sociology, religious and area studies, and education as well as scholars in libraries and museums concerned with the storage and preservation of knowledge in book form.

    Speakers:
    Professor Tim Barratt (SOAS), Professor Joerg Baten (Tübingen), Professor Laurence Brockliss (Oxford), Professor Peter Burke, (Cambridge), Professor Michela Bussotti (Ecole francaise d'Extreme-Orient), Dr Hilde De Weerdt (King's College London), Professor Jean-Pierre Drège (EPHE), Professor Simon Eliot (SAS, University of London), Dr Aileen Fyfe (University of St Andrews), Professors Qi Han (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Professor Ian Inkster (Nottingham Trent), Professor Peter Kornicki (Cambridge), Professor Maarten Prak (Utrecht), Professor James Raven (Essex), Professor Joan-Pau Rubiés (LSE), Professor Dagmar Schaefer (Manchester), Professor Hans Ulrich Vogel (Tübingen), Professor Harriet Zurndorfer (Leiden), Professor Manel Ollé (Universitat Pompeu Fabra)

    Public Lecture and Panel Discussion: Professor Ken Pomeranz (Chicago): Knowledge Formation and Economic Divergence between China and the West

    Respondents: Professor Bill Bell (Edinburgh), Professor Mark Elvin (Oxford), and Professor Peer Vries (Vienna)

    Conference Convenors: Professor O'Brien (LSE) P.O'Brien@lse.ac.uk and Dr Ting Xu (LSE) T.Xu1@lse.ac.uk

    This event is FREE but registration is required.

    Programme available here: http://www.britac.ac.uk/events/2013/the_production_and_circulation_of_printed_books.cfm

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    Broadside Day 2013
    23 February 2013 - 9.30am-5.30pm
    Cecil Sharp House, 2 Regents Park Road, London NW1 7AY

    Our fourth annual one-day event exploring all aspects of Street Literature and Popular Print Traditions

    Organised jointly by the English Folk Dance & Song Society and Traditional Song Forum

    See website for booking details: http://www.efdss.org/events/eventsdetails/eventsId/684/displaydate/2013-02-23

    The morning session will include short papers on our usual range of street literature topics. Some half-hour slots are still available if anyone wishes to submit a proposal.

    Contact Steve Roud: sroud@btinternet.com

    The afternoon will be devoted to a presentation and demonstration of the important IBBA project (Integrated Broadside Ballad Archive), described in its funding application as:

    The new integrated website will be officially launched, demonstrated, and tested on the day, with plenty of opportunity for participants' questions and comments.

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    Writers and their Libraries
    15 - 16 March 2013
    Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London, Senate House

    Call for papers
    This conference in the History of Reading will bring together scholars working on the private libraries of some of the major literary figures in world literature. The aim of the conference is to explore reading habits, note-taking practices, marginalia and other traces of reading experience and book collecting in a comparative context. At the same time, the conference will offer a forum for the discussion of theories and methodologies that underpin this kind of research, as well as the problems and challenges of reclaiming, representing and editing the evidence of reading writers and writing readers from the archive.

    We invite proposals for 20-minute papers that explore writers' private libraries -- regardless of whether the library is real or virtual. We welcome contributions from any world culture, language, field, and period. Interdisciplinary approaches are encouraged.

    The following list is meant to be indicative of the possible strands, themes and topics that might be covered:

    Deadline for proposals (300 words): 15 July 2012.

    Note: A collection of essays from selected papers will be published.

    Inquiries and proposals may be directed to: Patricio Ferrari (Universidade de Lisboa) ferraripatricio@gmail.com, Dr Jerónimo Pizarro (Universidad de los Andes) jeronimopizarro@gmail.com, Dr Wim Van Mierlo (Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London) Wim.Van-Mierlo@sas.ac.uk

    For an example of a writer's private library visit Fernando Pessoa's Private Library on-line at http://casafernandopessoa.cm-lisboa.pt/bdigital/index/index.htm

    Conference blog: http://writersandtheirlibraries.wordpress.com/

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    Printed Image and Decorative Print, 1500-1750
    22 March 2013
    University of Reading

    Speakers include Eric Kindel, James Mosley, Clare Backhouse and Angela McShane.

    The registration fee of £10 includes refreshments and lunch.

    For further details, including a full programme and booking form, please visit Reading University’s Early Modern Research Centre website or contact Rebecca Bullard on r.bullard@reading.ac.uk.

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    Industry and Genius: John Baskerville: art, industry and technology in the Enlightenment
    6 - 7 April 2013
    The Woodbrooke Quaker Study Centre, 1046 Bristol Road, Birmingham, UK

    Organised by the Baskerville Society in conjunction with The Typographic Hub, Birmingham Institute of Art & Design [BCU] and the Centre for West Midlands History at the University of Birmingham

    This conference explores the life context and significance of the eighteenth-century typographer, printer industrialist and Enlightenment figure, John Baskerville (1706-1775), from the perspective of different subject disciplines.

    Baskerville was a Birmingham inventor, entrepreneur and artist with a worldwide reputation who made eighteenth-century Birmingham a city without typographic equal, by changing the course of type design. Baskerville, who made his fortune as a maker of japanware, not only designed one of the world’s most historically important founts, he also experimented with casting and setting type, improved the construction of the printingpress, developed a new kind of paper and refined the quality of printing inks. His typographic experiments put him ahead of his time, had an international impact and did much to enhance the printing and publishing industries of his day. Yet despite his importance, fame and influence many aspects of Baskerville’s work and life remain unexplored and his contribution to printing, the arts, technological change and the Enlightenment are largely unrecognized.

    Call for papers
    This conference will consider Baskerville’s contribution to both typographic and eighteenth-century history. Proposals for papers are welcome on one or more of the following themes:

    Sources and bibliography
    Papers of 25 minutes duration are invited from:

    Please supply a 300 word proposal plus a 200 word resumé, preferably by e-mail attachment in Word to both Caroline Archer and Malcolm Dick at the addresses shown by: Monday 1 October 2012

    Fees for speakers
    £40 - one day; £70 - two days
    Booking details will be provided in due course

    Contact Details
    Dr Caroline Archer
    caroline.archer@bcu.ac.uk
    0121 331 5871
    The Typographic Hub
    Birmingham Institute of Art & Design [BCU]
    Corporation Street, Gosta Green, Birmingham B4 7DX
    www.typographichub.org

    Dr Malcolm Dick
    m.m.dick@bham.ac.uk
    0121 415 8253
    The Centre for West Midland History
    School of History and Cultures, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT
    www.birmingham.ac.uk/research/activity/cwmh/index.aspx

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    Illustrating the Early Printed Book
    12 April 2013
    Aula of Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands, The Hague

    A Conference on the Occasion of the Publication of Ina Kok, Woodcuts in Incunabula printed in the Low Countries

    Hes & De Graaf Publishers, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, National Library of the Netherlands (KB) and the Dutch Book Historical Society (NBV) are organising a conference on 12 April 2013 on the occasion of the publication of the long awaited revised edition of Ina Kok's widely admired and groundbreaking dissertation on the woodcut illustrations in incunabula printed in the Low Countries between 1475 and 1501.

    At the start of the conference, the book Woodcuts in Incunabula printed in the Low Countries will officially be presented, after which an international selection of speakers will present the world of the early printed book, their cataloguing and digitisation, and of course the woodcuts they contain. Speakers are Paul Needham (Scheide Library, Princeton), Lotte Hellinga (British Library, London), Bettina Wagner (Bayerische Staatsbibliothek, München), John Goldfinch (British Library, London),Cristina Dondi (University of Oxford), Marieke van Delft (Koninklijke Bibliotheek), Truusje Goedings and Andrea van Leerdam (Utrecht University).

    Conference fee: 25 euro, including coffee, lunch and drinks (10 euro for students and members of the NBV, please mark on your payment).

    Further details: http://www.boekgeschiedenis.nl/default.asp?keuze=detail&id=918

    Email: illustratingearlyprintedbook@gmail.com

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    Oxford Book Fair
    20 - 21 April 2013
    Oxford Brookes University, Oxford

    Opening times are Saturday 12 Noon-6pm, Sunday 10am-4pm. Admission £2.00.

    It is a Premier PBFA Book Fair which has been held in Oxford every year since 1975 and this year is oversubscribed with almost a hundred exhibitors from all parts of the country.

    This Fair is for anyone interested in books and reading and is a great place to start collecting. There will be a wide range of antiquarian, out of print and rare books for sale, from a few pounds to several thousand pounds. Selected highlights can be viewed on the website as well as detailed information about all aspects of the Fair. www.oxfordbookfair.org.

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    Describing, Analysing and Identifying Early Modern Handwriting: Methods and Issues
    25 April 2013 - 9.30-4
    T. S. Eliot Theatre, Merton College, Oxford

    Although the past twenty years have seen a rapid growth in scholarship on early modern English manuscripts, the study of handwriting in the period still seems to be in its infancy. Methods of describing, distinguishing and identifying hands differ from scholar to scholar and, although the work of individual early modernists is often based on very substantial unarticulated ‘tacit knowledge’ about the dating and differentiation of script styles, little detailed work on the topic has been published. Most of the scholarship in the area focuses, in an ad hoc way, on high-status manuscripts and on the identification of hands associated with major figures. This one-day workshop will explore the potential for future collaboration on more comprehensive and systematic ways of understanding the variation between different hands in the period, and specifically the possibilities for a new project which will aim to produce substantial publicly-available material mapping key elements in the development of English handwriting between 1500 and 1700. Speakers and chairs will include: Carlo M. Bajetta (Aosta), Peter Beal (Institute of English Studies, London), Giles Bergel (Oxford), Colin Burrow (Oxford) Guillaume Coatalen (Cergy-Pontoise), Julia Craig-McFeely (Oxford), Tom Davis (Birmingham), Jonathan Gibson (Open University), Gabriel Heaton (Sotheby’s), Simon Horobin (Oxford), Steven W. May (Sheffield), William Poole (Oxford), Daniel Wakelin (Oxford), Heather Wolfe (Folger Shakespeare Library), Henry Woudhuysen (Oxford).

    It is organized by the Centre for Early Modern Studies and Merton College History of the Book Group, with the co-operation of the Bodleian Library Centre for the Study of the Book.

    The workshop has been timed so that delegates can also attend one of Professor Richard Beadle’s Lyell Lectures, 'Medieval English Literary Autographs 1: Fugitive Pieces', in the same venue at 5pm.

    Registration (£20, graduates £15, including light lunch) through a link on the CEMS home page, http://www.cems-oxford.org/ and a timetable and fuller details will be provided there shortly. For queries please contact Dr Jonathan Gibson, Jonathan.Gibson@open.ac.uk. Please register by Thursday 18 April.

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    Network Conference for German Scholars of Book History and Print Culture
    9 - 10 May 2013
    University of Freiburg, Germany

    The study of print culture or book history is an interdisciplinary challenge that has been met in different ways across the globe. The subject has been burgeoning in the Anglophone academic world for nearly two decades now, and 2013 marks the 21st anniversary of the first annual meeting of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing (SHARP). While the German tradition in the study of the book was established many decades before, it seems to us that scholars from German-speaking countries are rather thinly represented internationally. We want to change this!

    Please register by April 26 via email: bookhistorynetwork@anglistik.uni-freiburg.de. The registration fee is €20 (€10 for SHARP members). This includes coffee breaks. Please let us know whether you will join us for dinner so we can make reservations.

    Conference programme: http://www.anglistik.uni-freiburg.de/seminar/abteilungen/literaturwissenschaft/ls_korte/Bilder/networkconf

    Organisation:
    Doris Lechner & Stefanie Lethbridge, Freiburg
    Corinna Norrick-Rühl, Mainz

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    Reanimating Playbooks: Editing for Performance, Performance for Editing
    10 May 2013
    The Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon

    A one-day symposium to engage in the conversation between performance and text.

    We wish to provide a space to explore editorial practices on both sides of publication (from preparation to practice) and to explore how we use, compose, and conceptualise critical editions of Renaissance plays. The day will include a plenary panel of editors and theatre practitioners and two practical workshops.

    Speakers are invited to submit proposals for 10 minute ‘provocations’ in which a question may be posed, a sticky editorial decision worked through, a long-standing practice interrogated, a new methodology explored, or something else entirely queried, crowd-sourced, considered, contested or created. Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

    We also welcome proposals for 15-20 minute papers or workshops. A limited number of volunteer actors may be available for workshops; anticipated requests ideally would be included in your proposal. Please submit 150-word abstracts, along with brief biographical statement to C K Ash at cxa052@bham.ac.uk by Friday 15 March. Accepted proposals will be notified 22 March. Please do not hesitate to e-mail her with any questions about the event.

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    Children's Book Publishing in the Hand-Press Period: progress in research.
    11 May 2013
    St Paul's Girls' School, Brook Green, Hammersmith, London W6 7BS

    Organised by the Children's Books History Society

    Programme
    10.15 Pat Garrett & Matthew Grenby - Welcome
    10.30 Andrea Immel: Rewriting the history of children's book illustration: The contribution of the House of Newbery
    11.15 David Stoker: The pitfalls of seeking respectability: the rise and fall and rise again of John Marshall
    12.00 Jill Shefrin: Pasted on Boards, for Hanging up in Nurseries: the Engraver, the Printer and the Juvenile Novelty Market, 1660-1825
    12.45 LUNCH
    1.45 Nigel Tattersfield: Saint or Sinner? Thomas Saint of Newcastle. Bookseller, printer and pirate
    2.30 Matthew Grenby: William Godwin's Juvenile Library: 'a talent for the production of books for children' versus 'Things as they are'
    3.15 Brian Alderson, and speakers: Summation and 'looking ahead
    4.00-4.30 Close and Tea

    Nearest Stations: Hammersmith (District, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly Lines); Olympia (Rail and District Line) The school is about a 5 minute walk from Hammersmith Station, and a 10 minute walk from Olympia.
    Bus routes 9, 10, 27, 33, 72, 190, 211, 220, 266, 267, 283, 391
    Parking: There is pay and display parking (£3.00 per hour for up to 8 hours) on Brook Green and the surrounding roads.
    Entrance through large main door, ring bell.

    Fee: £25 CBHS Members, £30 non-members. This includes refreshments and a sandwich lunch. Please contact The Secretary, Robert Kirkpatrick rkirkpatrick.molesworth@virgin.net for a booking form.

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    Texts, Forms and Readings in Europe (18th-21st centuries): SHARP Focussed Conference
    22 - 24 May 2013
    Université du Maine, Le Mans, France

    This conference will question the relevance of the notion of a common European reader with regard to the evolution of reading practices from the so-called reading revolution in the 18th century until the current digital revolution. Europe is known as the birthplace of books, and it remains a major seat of book publishing and translating. Since an early stage its strongly established book culture has implied the durable circulation of books. This tradition has contributed to cultural exchanges and to the creation of reading communities across national borders. A relationship to the book and to reading, as well as their promotion and enhancement, seems to be a common value and a significant component of European identity. However, book policies and reading practices in Europe have varied from one region to another throughout history. Such idiosyncrasies – whether regional, national, social, economic, cultural or legal -- make European identity recognizable even though nowadays globalization and the digital revolution tend to reduce those specificities.

    Guglielmo Cavallo and Roger Chartier's A History of Reading in the West (Polity Press, 1999) has taught us that reading is not an abstract action: it realizes itself through practices, situations, and readers, who “are never faced with an abstract, ideal text detached from everything material: they manipulate objects; they listen to words whose modalities govern the way they read or listen, but in the process also govern ways of comprehending the text.” Taking into account the strong link between texts, forms and readings as well as the fact that reading has not remained immutable, this interdisciplinary conference will study the elements of continuity and disruption that are characteristic of the uses of texts and of reading practices in 18th-21st-century Europe.

    The conference welcomes proposals on the following topics

    We have planned a pre-workshop for early career researchers (including PhD students and post-docs) interested in all aspects of children’s, teenagers’ and young adults’ reading practices. This pre-workshop will consist of a poster session with a moderator.

    RECOMMENDATIONS:

  • Proposals should adhere to the aforementioned spatiotemporal frame and may consist of a case study or of a broader theoretical approach.
  • Papers with a comparative approach are particularly welcome.
  • The languages of the conference are English and French.
  • The proposals (a 500-word abstract in French or in English, specifying the theoretical and methodological context, sources, etc.) will be reviewed by the program committee.
  • Papers will be considered for further publication.
  • Proposals for 20-minutes presentations should be sent to the program committee before December 7th, 2012: Prof. Brigitte Ouvry-Vial Textes-Formes- Lectures2013@univ-lemans.fr

    Proposals of posters (A1) for the pre-workshop should also be sent to Corinna Norrick-Rühl norrick@uni-mainz.de

    SCHEDULE:
    Deadline for submission of proposals: 7th December 2012
    Notification of acceptance: 15th January 2013
    Deadline for confirmation of participation: 1st February 2013

    Practical details (registration fees etc.) will be sent with the notification of acceptance

    GUEST SPEAKERS:
    Opening lecture by Prof. Roger Chartier (Collège de France)
    Closing lecture by Prof. Bernard Lahire (Ecole Normale Supérieure Lettres et Sciences Humaines)

    PROGRAM COMMITTEE: Laurent Bazin (University Versailles - Saint-Quentin-en- Yvelines), Jean-François Botrel (University Rennes II), Lodovica Braida (University Milano), Hans-Jurgen Lüsebrink (University Sarreland), Brigitte Ouvry-Vial (University Maine), Nathalie Richard (University Maine), Jürgen Ritte (University Paris III - Sorbonne Nouvelle)

    INSTITUTIONAL PARTNERS: SHARP; Universitédu Maine (Le Mans) ; Lab 'Langues, Littératures, Linguistique' Universities of Angers and Maine; Dipartimento di Studi storici from Università degli Studi Milano and APICE; Ville du Mans ; Carré Plantagenêt, Musée d'Art et d'Histoire (le Mans).

    LOCATION : Le Mans is located 50 mn from Paris by train. In the middle of Region Pays-de-la-Loire, it is famous for its white wines, its /Rillettes/ special pâté, and aside from the formula One race '24 heures du Mans', it features several theater companies and a stunning historical district, Cité Plantagenêt (the film Cyrano de Bergerac was shot there), where conference participants will enjoy crawling.

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    The Hand in the Text: Renaissance Acts of Writing and Printerventions
    25 May 2013
    Sir Duncan Rice Library, Centre for Early Modern Studies, University of Aberdeen

    Organised by Early Modern Studies in Scotland Seminar

    A one-day symposium exploring the agency of the hand in textual transmission

    Programme

    For further information please contact the organiser Andrew Gordon: a.gordon@abdn.ac.uk

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    Text and Image in the City: Print and Manuscript Culture in British and European Towns and Cities
    31 May 2013
    Centre for Urban History, University of Leicester

    A Book History Research Network Study Day

    Programme
    9.30 Registration (tea and coffee available)
    10.00 Welcome
    10.15 Session 1
    Daliah Bond (Aberdeen) Defining the Scottish Chapbook: a description of the 'typical Scottish chapbook'
    Gervase French (Leicester) Newcastle's Chapbook Literature: rival identities and popular culture, 1750-1832
    Jack Mockford (Hertfordshire/British Museum) Flash Notes: imitation paper money in late Georgian England
    11.30 Tea/Coffee
    12.00 Session 2
    Geraldine Marshall (Birmingham City) Birmingham’s Graphic DNA: reading the 'word city' through signage, architectural letter forms and the typographic landscape
    Sandro Jung (Ghent) The Topography of Urban Architecture: Peacock's The Polite Repository, 1800-1820
    Caroline Archer (Birmingham City) Paris Underground: the missing memory of the city
    1.15 Sandwich lunch
    2.00 Sarah Kirby, Printmaker, Artist in Residence at the Centre for Urban History
    2.30 Session 3
    Rosa Smurra (Bologna) 'Studium', Manuscript Books and Urban Landscape: Bologna, 13th/14th centuries
    Sarah Laseke (Oxford) Scribes in the City: the urban manuscript production of romances in the 15th Century
    3.20 Tea/Coffee
    3.50 Session 4
    Matt Harle (Birkbeck) Tomorrow's London: the GLC and London's abandoned future of the 1960s
    Rathna Ramanathan (Central St Martin’s) London's Little Presses
    4.40 Final discussion
    5.00 End

    Fuller details (PDF): http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/urbanhistory/news/Text%20and%20Image%20in%20the%20City%20CfP.pdf

    COST: £10 (PAY CASH ON THE DAY) FOR REFRESHMENTS AND A SANDWICH LUNCH. To reserve a place email John Hinks: jh241@le.ac.uk.

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    Textual Bibliography for Modern Foreign Languages
    10 June 2013
    Eliot Room, Conference Centre, The British Library, 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB

    Programme
    11.00 Registration and Coffee
    11.45 PABLO ALVAREZ (University of Michigan), The Literary Sources of Alonso Víctor de Paredes’s Institución, y origen del arte de la imprenta, y reglas generales para los componedores [Madrid, 1680]
    12.30 Lunch (Own arrangements).
    1.45 ALESSANDRO TEDESCO (University of Udine), Texts and images in printed editions of accounts of pilgrims' journeys to the Holy Land: the characteristics and evolution of the editorial genre of Itinera ad Loca Sancta, from the fifteenth to the eighteenth century
    2.30 JONATHAN HENSHER (University of Manchester), 'Cover Girls' - The representation and changing roles of women in illustrated title pages from Italian and French editions of Orlando furioso, circa 1600-1850
    3.15 Tea
    3.45 GODFRIED CROENEN (University of Liverpool), Reconstructing a publication history in the manuscript age: identifying and dating authorial and scribal versions of Book I of Jean Froissart’s Chronicles
    4.30 SUSAN REED (British Library), A tale of two cities: print culture of the 1848 revolution in Berlin and Vienna

    The Seminar will end at 5.15 pm.

    Please notify us by email or by post using the form below if you are able to attend.

    Barry Taylor (barry.taylor@bl.uk; tel 020 7412 7576)
    Susan Reed (susan.reed@bl.uk; tel 020 7412 7572)

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    Romanticism at the Fin de Siècle
    14 - 15 June 2013
    Trinity College, Oxford

    An international conference on collecting, editing, performing, producing, reading, and reviving Romanticism at the Fin de Siècle

    Keynote Speaker: Professor Joseph Bristow (UCLA)

    Call For Papers
    This conference places Romanticism at the core of the British Fin de Siècle. As an anti-Victorian movement, the British Fin de Siècle is often read forwards and absorbed into a 'long twentieth century', in which it takes the shape of a prehistory or an embryonic form of modernism. By contrast, Fin-de-Siècle authors and critics looked back to the past in order to invent their present and imagine their future. Just at the time when the concept of 'Victorian' crystallized a distinct set of literary and cultural practices, the radical break with the immediate past found in Romanticism an alternative poetics and politics of the present.

    The Fin de Siècle played a distinctive and crucial role in the reception of Romanticism. Romanticism emerged as a category, a dialogue of forms, a movement, a style, and a body of cultural practices. The Fin de Siècle established the texts of major authors such as Blake and Shelley, invented a Romantic canon in a wider European and comparative context, but also engaged in subversive reading practices and other forms of underground reception.

    The aim of this conference is to foster a dialogue between experts of the two periods. We welcome proposals for papers on all aspects of Fin-de-Siècle Romanticism, especially with a cross-disciplinary or comparative focus. Topics might include:

    Deadline for abstracts: 30 January 2013 (extended!) Please email 300-word abstracts to romanticfin@bbk.ac.uk

    Conference organisers: Luisa Calè (Birkbeck) and Stefano Evangelista (Oxford). This conference is co-organised by the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies and the English Faculty of Oxford University with the support of the MHRA

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    London Rare Books School (2013)
    24 - 28 June and 1 - 5 July 2013
    Institute of English Studies, University of London

    Applications are now invited for London Rare Books School (LRBS), taking place 24 - 28 June 2013 and 1 - 5 July 2013.

    The application form is available from the Institute of English Studies website: http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/research-training-summer-schools/london-rare-books-school/application-bursaries.

    Courses are £600, and a £100 deposit is requested upon application. A limited number of bursaries are available. Placements are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Courses may be taken for academic credit http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/study-training/research-training-summer-schools/london-rare-books-school/fees-credit

    The courses are taught by internationally renowned scholars associated with the Institute's Centre for Manuscript and Print Studies, using the unrivalled library and museum resources of London, including the British Library, the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, Senate House Libraries, and many more. All courses stress the materiality of the book, and each class is restricted to a maximum of twelve students.

    Applications should be submitted to IESEvents@sas.ac.uk.

    The course programme is below. For further details, see the LRBS website: http://www.ies.sas.ac.uk/london-rare-books-school

    Week one: 24-28 June 2013
    The Book in the Ancient World
    Children’s Books, 1470-1980
    An Introduction to Bibliography
    Mapping Land and Sea before 1900
    The Medieval Book
    The Printed Book in Europe, 1450-2000
    Type and its Uses, 1455-1830

    Week two: 1-5 July 2013
    The Anglo-Saxon and Carolingian Book, c600-1050
    European Bookbinding, 1450-1820
    The History and Practice of Hand Press Printing, 1450-1830
    The History of Libraries from the Middle Ages to the Present
    An Introduction to Illustration and its Technologies
    Modern First Editions: Dealing, Collecting and the Market
    Modern Literary Manuscripts

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    Reading in Conflict: an Interdisciplinary Seminar
    24 June 2013 - 10-4
    Christodoulou Meeting Room 01, The Open University, Milton Keynes

    This interdisciplinary seminar will bring researchers together to explore the question of how reading is implicated in diverse forms of conflict, including class conflict, military conflict, and conflict over political questions such as race and immigration. Presentations of cutting edge research on reading from the 19th century to the present day will be followed by group discussion of current knowledge and future directions for research and publication.

    Programme

    10.00 Tea / coffee
    10.15 Welcome and introductions
    10.30 Rosalind Crone, History, The Open University: Reading in the 19th century prison
    11.00 Edmund King, English, The Open University: Reading in a conflict zone: E.W. Hornung, the YMCA, and the reading soldier in the First World War
    11.30 Catherine Feely, History, University of Sheffield: Fighting for the right reading : the struggle for Karl Marx's Capital
    12.00 Lunch
    13.00 Daniel Allington, Language and Communication, The Open University: Not reading in conflict: the status of The Satanic Verses during the Satanic Verses controversy
    13.30 Vincent Trott, History, The Open University: Horror, heroism, and the humble Tommy : reader responses to Great War autobiographies in the 21st century
    14.00 Alex Laffer, Language and Communication, The Open University: Conflicted positioning: how reading groups talk about a fictional asylum seeker
    14.30 Tea / coffee
    14.45 Group discussion
    16.00 Close

    Attendance is free but booking is essential. For booking and queries, please contact Alex Laffer (a.laffer@open.ac.uk).

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    Translation and the Circulation of Knowledge in Early Modern Science
    28 June 2013
    Warburg Institute, London

    Organized by Sietske Fransen (Warburg Institute) and Niall Hodson (Durham University) in collaboration with Prof. Joanna Woodall (Courtauld Institute), Dr Eric Jorink (Huygens ING) and Prof. Peter Mack (the Warburg Institute).

    Keynote speaker: Prof. Sven Dupré (Freie Universität Berlin)

    Paper proposals are invited for a one-day colloquium on the role of translation and translators in the circulation of knowledge in Early Modern science.

    In recent decades, scholars have offered myriad new insights into the exchange and propagation of scientific ideas in the early modern Republic of Letters. Within this vibrant field, however, the part played by translation and translators remains little studied. This colloquium will explore the role of translation in early modern science, providing a forum for discussion about translations as well as the translators, mediators, agents, and interpreters whose role in the intellectual history of the period remains ill defined and deserves greater attention. The topics listed below offer some guidance for proposals:

    Proposals for 25-minute papers should be submitted to Niall Hodson (n.d.hodson@durham.ac.uk) and Sietske Fransen (sietske.fransen@postgrad.sas.ac.uk) by 28th February 2013. A dedicated committee will evaluate the proposals and respond to submissions by 15th March 2013.

    Proposals should ideally take the form of a 500-word abstract.

    This colloquium is supported by the Warburg Institute and Durham University, and is organized in collaboration with the Visualizing Knowledge in the Early Modern Netherlands project at the Courtauld Institute, London

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    Floreat Bibliomania: Great Collectors and their Grand Designs - A centenary conference in memory of A.N.L. (Tim) Munby
    28 - 29 June 2013
    King's College, Cambridge

    Tim Munby pioneered the historical study of British book collecting and the use of sale catalogues to trace the history of taste in books. His work brought sale catalogues into the academic domain as important literary and historical documents worthy of study. Munby's five-volume Phillipps Studies provided the first comprehensive account of bibliophiles and book dealers of the nineteenth century. His other works include The Cult of the Autograph Letter in England, Connoisseurs and Medieval Miniatures, 1750–1850 and a book of ghost stories, The Alabaster Hand.

    Munby was Fellow and Librarian of King's College, Cambridge, from 1947 to 1974, having worked previously in the antiquarian book trade. He was Lyell Reader in Bibliography at Oxford 1962-63, a Founding Trustee of the British Library, President of the Bibliographical Society and co-founder of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society. His scholarship, kindness and sense of fun won him many admirers.

    King's College will hold a conference on 28-29 June 2013 to mark the centenary of Munby’s birth. The theme, 'Floreat Bibliomania - Great Collectors and their Grand Designs' will provide an opportunity to map current and future developments in the study of collectors and collecting.

    Principal speakers include Nicolas Barker, Penelope Bulloch, Christopher de Hamel, Anthony Edwards, Anthony Hobson, Peter Jones, David McKitterick, David Pearson, and Toshiyuki Takamiya. Reflecting Munby’s generosity to students, the event will also feature panels of young bibliographers and book collectors. Delegates will have the chance to visit private exhibits in the Founder’s Library of the Fitzwilliam Museum and in the King’s College Library, as well as a special Munby exhibit at the Cambridge University Library.

    A celebratory reception and dinner will take place on the first evening of the conference.

    Conference website: http://www.kingsmembers.org/Munby2013

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    Libraries in the Public Sphere : how the past informs the present and the future
    1 July 2013
    Manchester Metropolitan University

    Reminder - the deadline for bookings is 7 June.

    Library and Information History Group's 2013 Conference, at a satellite to CILIP Umbrella (which starts on the Tuesday)

    The conference is packed with papers that are bound to generate discussion. From the effects of austerity on collection development to the organisation of voluntary libraries, the historical perspective is strikingly relevant to the challenges facing libraries today. Papers cover a range of topics from mobile libraries to academic liaison.

    It is very reasonably priced and highly accessible, with registration from 10.30 to allow for travel time.

    The full programme, further details about the venue, and booking form are all available from www.lihg.org/conference

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    Book History and Bibliography in Spain: Toward a Definition of Their Boundaries and Objectives / Bibliografía e Historia del Libro en España: hacia una definición de sus fronteras y objetivos
    3 July 2013
    Biblioteca Histórica Marqués de Valdecilla, University Complutense of Madrid, Spain

    Speakers:
    Antonio Castillo Gómez (Universidad de Alcalá)
    Marina Garone (Instituto de Investigaciones Bibliográficas. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)
    Victor Infantes (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
    Alberto Montaner Frutos (Universidad de Zaragoza)
    Fermín de los Reyes Gómez (Universidad Complutense)
    Enrique Villalba (Universidad Carlos III)

    Organiser: Benito Rial Costas (benito@ombrettaetc.net)

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    Transitions
    4 - 5 July 2013
    Corsham Court, Bath Spa University, Corsham

    Registration now open: http://transitionsbtp.wordpress.com/fees-registration/

    Bath Spa University's Book, Text, and Place 1500-1750 research centre hosts a biannual conference devoted to early modern literary culture, place, and the history of the book. Following upon the success of our inaugural conference, Book Encounters, 1500-1750, this year’s conference will focus on the theme of Transitions, whether material, spatial and/or temporal in the period 1500-1750. This conference will held 4-5 July, 2013 at our wonderful Corsham Court centre, just outside Bath.

    Plenary Speakers:
    Professor Julie Sanders (University of Nottingham)
    Professor Marcus Walsh (University of Liverpool)
    Professor Henry Woudhuysen (Lincoln College, University of Oxford)

    Transitions 1500-1750 aims to explore a wide range of transitions from a variety of critical and historical perspectives. We are particularly interested in papers that reflect on the impact that such transitions had on early modern subjects, institutions, material culture, habits of thought as well as literary, social and cultural practices. Different disciplinary perspectives are especially encouraged. Possible topics of study include:

    Please send proposals for papers (20mins) and any queries to transitionsatbathspa@gmail.com by 31 March 2013 [extended deadline].

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    Books, Catalogues and Databases: Exploring Renaissance Vernacular Aristotelianism
    5 July 2013 - 2-5pm
    The British Library (Conference Centre, Eliot Room), London

    14.00 Stephen Parkin (British Library) and David A. Lines (University of Warwick): Welcome
    14.10 Eugenio Refini (University of Warwick): The 'Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy' Database 14.30 John Goldfinch (British Library): The Incunabula Short Title Catalogue
    14.50 Sara Servello (Istituto Centrale per il Catalogo Unico, Rome): Edit 16: Censimento nazionale delle edizioni italiane del XVI secolo
    15.10 Flavia Bruni (University of St Andrews): The Universal Short Title Catalogue
    15.30 Coffee Break
    15.45 Round Table
    Cristina Dondi (University of Oxford & CERL)
    Paul Gehl (The Newberry Library, Chicago)
    Laura Nuvoloni (University of Cambridge - Incunabula Project)
    Stephen Parkin (British Library)

    Event organised within the AHRC-funded project 'Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy' (University of Warwick & The Warburg Institute, London) in collaboration with the British Library.

    Attendance is free of charge, but registration is recommended for practical reasons. For information and registration please contact E.Refini@warwick.ac.uk

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    The 45th Annual Conference of the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals: Tradition and New
    12 - 13 July 2013
    University of Salford, Manchester, UK

    The Research Society for Victorian Periodicals (RSVP) will hold its annual conference at the University of Salford, on 12th and 13th July 2013. As always, proposals for papers that address any aspect of nineteenth-century British magazines or newspapers will be considered. However, this year, we particularly encourage proposals on ‘tradition and the new’ in the nineteenth-century press. Possible topics might include:

    Please e-mail two-page (maximum) proposals for individual presentations or panels of three to RSVP2013@rs4vp.org. Please also include a one-page C.V. with relevant publications, teaching, and/or coursework. Several merit-based travel grants will be made available to students; please indicate if you would like to be considered for one of these. Final papers should take 15 minutes (20 minutes maximum) to present. The deadline for submissions is February 1st, 2013.

    For more information about the Research Society for Victorian Periodicals, visit RSVP's website at http://rs4vp.org

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    Gendering the Book
    13 July 2013
    University of Leeds

    Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers for Gendering the Book, a one-day conference to be held at the University of Leeds on the 13th of July 2013. The conference will close with a keynote address from Professor Richard Cronin (University of Glasgow).

    This conference aims to connect recent scholarship in the areas of book-history and material culture to work on Romantic constructions of masculinity and femininity by considering how men and women in the long eighteenth century imagined their relationship to textual objects. How did cultures of production, consumption, and exchange contribute to the construction of gendered identities? Did these practices and identities change over time, and how far was the book itself a gendered object?

    Topics might include, but are not limited to:

    Please send abstracts of 250 words and any other queries to Cassie Ulph and Alys Mostyn at genderingthebook@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions: March 1st 2013.

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    SHARP 2013: Geographies of the Book
    18 - 21 July 2013
    Philadelphia

    Registration now open!

    Outline programme

    Conference website: http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/lectures/SHARP2013/

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    Print Networks Conference: Travel, Topography and the Book Trade
    23 - 25 July 2013
    University of Chichester

    Guest speakers: Professor Bill Bell (Cardiff University) and Anthony Payne (Anthony Payne Rare Books & Manuscripts).

    Booking is now open! Programme and booking details (payment by PayPal) are here: www.bookhistory.org.uk/print-networks/events

    The thirty-first Print Networks Conference on the History of the British book trade will take place at the University of Chichester on 23rd-25th July 2013.

    Due to the proximity of the conference venue to the south coast, ‘Travel, Topography and the Book Trade’ has been chosen as the theme for the conference. The theme is broadly defined, and any papers relating to the production, distribution and reception of texts and images about travel, imagined and real, from the Middle Ages to the modern era will be considered.

    The Print Networks Conference also offers an annual fellowship to a postgraduate scholar whose research falls within the parameters of the conference brief, and who wishes to present a paper at the conference. The fellowship covers the cost of attending the conference and some assistance towards costs of travel. A summary of the research being undertaken accompanied by a letter of recommendation from a tutor or supervisor should be sent to the above address by 31st January 2013.

    The papers presented will be considered for publication; details to follow at the conference. It is understood that papers offered to the conference will be original work and not delivered to any similar body before presentation at this conference.

    En-suite accommodation will be provided on the Bishop Otter campus of the University of Chichester. In addition to a full programme of papers, there will be a conference dinner and a visit to the special collections of the University of Chichester library.

    Posted by John Hinks on behalf of the Print Networks conference committee. Please direct all enquiries to Catherine Armstrong: C.M.Armstrong@mmu.ac.uk

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    Early Modern Paratexts
    26 July 2013
    Clifton Hill House, Lower Clifton Hill, University of Bristol

    Keynote speaker: Dr Helen Smith (University of York)

    Paratexts, as Gérard Genette describes them, are liminal textual elements -- such as prologues, glosses, notes, title pages -- that mediate relationships between the parties interested in the book. This conference seeks to explore how these elements manifest themselves and function within early modern literature. A range of speakers will present their research across seven panels: People of the Paratext; Prefacing the Text; 'And Another Thing...'; The Paratext Proper; Disrupting Reading; Shaping and Reshaping; Reading Materials. Further details can be found in the programme, and the call for papers, downloadable from the conference website.

    Conference website: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/research/events/2013/1489.html

    If you have any queries, please contact the organising committee by emailing earlymodernparatexts2013@gmail.com.

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    News and the Shape of Europe 1500-1750
    26-28 July 2013
    Queen Mary, University of London

    'News Networks in Early Modern Europe', a research network funded by the Leverhulme Trust and based at Queen Mary, University of London, is delighted to announce a three-day international symposium, to be held in Summer 2013 on the topic 'News and the Shape of Europe, 1500-1750'. The symposium is the culminating event of the News Networks project, a two-year interdisciplinary research project with members in England, France, Italy, the Low Countries and Spain, and with associates in Scotland, Portugal, Austria and Germany. Through a series of co-ordinated research meetings over two years, the project has examined methodological challenges and developed new approaches to a European history of news.

    There has been much work done by historians and literary scholars on national histories of news. Yet news in early modern Europe was a distinctively transnational phenomenon; its topics were international in scope; the forms and terminologies of news, as well as the news itself, crossed national boundaries; practices of news-gathering relied on networks of international agents; it was widely translated; it travelled along commercial routes, or through postal networks that developed in express imitation of one another and were designed to be mutually connected; and the forces attempting to control the press operated, or attempted to operate well outside of their actual jurisdiction. The spread of news and the appetite for it reflect changes in the geopolitical and confessional maps of Europe, spreading through ethnic and religious diasporas as well as diplomatic, mercantile, and scholarly networks. It helped forge communities on a local, national and international scale.

    This event will combine contributions from graduate students, emerging scholars and established academics with presentations of the research findings of the network. Proposals for papers are invited on topics sympathetic to the theme News and the Shape of Europe, 1500-1750. These might include, but are not limited to:

    Proposals for papers of 20 minutes should be submitted by the 28th of February 2013, in the form of abstracts of not more than 250 words. Please send abstracts, as well as all other enquiries about the event, to: n.j.moxham@qmul.ac.uk

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    Aberystwyth Bibliographical Group symposium
    6 - 8 September 2013
    University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter

    The Aberystwyth Bibliographical Group invites members and guests to a symposium to be held at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter, from Friday 6th September to Sunday 8th September. Lampeter is the earliest degree-awarding institution in England and Wales after Oxford and Cambridge, and holds a significant collection of rare books in its library.

    Speakers:
    Dr. Rhiannon Ifans: Welsh ballads
    Caroline Kerkham: William Pamplin (1806-1899) of Soho and Llandderfel, Bala: botanical agent and publisher/bookseller
    Rev. Dr. John Morgan-Guy: New insights on the donations of Thomas Phillips to the library at Lampeter
    Eiluned Rees: The wonderful world of bibliography
    Rev. Dr. David Selwyn: Some thoughts on Lampeter’s Foundation and historic collections as a resource for the historian of the book
    Prof. David Thorne: Some place names in the Teifi Valley

    There will be a tour on the Saturday afternoon of the historic parts of the College, and items from the Founders’ collections will be on display in the Roderic Bowen Library. A book sale will be held during the weekend in aid of the Group’s funds.

    The cost of the symposium will be approximately £160 per person. This will include en-suite single-room accommodation in the College for two nights, breakfast, lunch, and a three-course dinner with waitress service on both evenings. Please return the booking form (link below) by 9th August to the Secretary, Timothy Cutts, National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth, SY23 3BU, together with a non-returnable deposit of £20 per person, payable to the Aberystwyth Bibliographical Group.

    Booking form: http://users.aber.ac.uk/das/texts/aberbibgr3.htm

    All enquiries to Timothy please: timothy.cutts@llgc.org.uk

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    Early Modern Texts: Digital Methods and Methodologies
    16 - 17 September 2013
    University of Oxford

    The conference is intended as an opportunity to explore the current state of early modern textual studies and editing, and to consider possibilities for the future. There will be a particular focus on developing potential for collaborative work through scheduled networking sessions. Proposals including project demonstrations or ideas are encouraged, as are submissions from postgraduate and early career researchers.

    Please send proposals of no more than 300 words, together with a brief biography (100 words maximum), to eebotcp@bodleian.ox.ac.uk. Acceptances will be notified by Monday 29 April 2013.

    Conference website: http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/eebotcp/conferences/conference-eebo-tcp-2013/

    Programme now available: http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/eebotcp/conferences/conference-eebo-tcp-2013/programme/

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    Lost Libraries: a historical walking tour
    20 September 2013 - 6-8pm
    Gray's Inn Library, 5 South Square, High Holborn, London WC1R 5ET [meeting point]

    Twenty-first century London contains some of the finest book collections in the world, but what about the libraries that haven t survived? If you know where to look, London s streets and alleyways are crammed with the ghosts of libraries past.

    This walk will carry you back through London s history, to long-forgotten libraries, readers, librarians and collectors. In the company of Alice Ford-Smith, Lost Libraries uncovers some of the links between London s past and present book collections. From Bloomsbury to the City, you will hear tales of enterprise, transformation, obsession and destruction.

    Gray's Inn Library can be found through a narrow archway, between Rymans the stationers and the Cittie of York pub, on High Highborn. (Tube: Chancery Lane/Holborn.) After a brief look around the Library, we will set out at 6.15pm. The walk ends at approximately 8pm a few paces away from St Paul s underground station. Please be ready for occasional steps, and no breaks!

    Numbers are limited to 25 people, and pre-booking is essential. Tickets, which are non-refundable, are £10 each. To reserve, contact Renae Satterley by email, r.satterley@middletemple.org.uk or phone 020 7427 4830 This event is open to all, so early booking is recommended.

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    Edmond Malone's collection at the Bodleian Library
    30 September 2013 - 10.30am-4.30pm
    Pitt Rivers Lecture Room, South Parks Road, Oxford

    The collection of Edmond Malone (1741-1812), received in 1821, greatly increased the Bodleian Library's holdings of Elizabethan, Jacobean, and Caroline drama, and established the Bodleian as one of the great libraries for the study of Shakespeare. Join us to examine highlights of the collection and discuss Malone’s scholarship and influence.

    Speakers
    Marcus Walsh (Liverpool)
    Tiffany Stern (Oxford)
    Nick Groom (Exeter)
    Alan Coates (Bodleian)
    Moderator: James Loxley (Edinburgh)

    This event is free but you must be registered to attend: http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=5&catid=182&prodid=672

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    The Future and the Medical Book conference: The future of the book
    Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4LE
    30 October 2013 - 3.15pm to 7pm

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has organised a series of five conferences to discuss the issues around the future and the medical book.

    Each of the five conferences will have a theme and will include short talks by experts, followed by discussion. The themes include the future of libraries and their collections, conservation, digital publishing and open access, as well as writing and collecting books. These conferences are open to anyone with an interest in the future of books in general, although the focus will be on medical books.

    Speakers include David Pearson, Giles Mandelbrote, Nicolas Barker, Kristian Jensen, Matija Strlic and Julia Foster.

    Each conference starts with registration at 3.15pm, an optional tour of the RCP building at 3.30pm, and talks and discussion from 4pm until 7pm. They are open to all, and the charge is £10 per event (free to RCP fellows and members). Buffet supper is available afterwards if booked in advance for £45 total per event

    Full information and booking forms are available online at: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/future-and-medical-book

    If you have any questions please contact enquiries@rcplondon.ac.uk.

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    Chemistry and its Books
    9 November 2013
    Royal Institution, London

    The Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry (SHAC) and the Bolton Society will hold a joint meeting at the Royal Institution in London on Saturday 9 November 2013. To register, please go to: http://www.ambix.org/chemistry-and-its-books-nov-2013/

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    Resurrecting the Book
    15 - 17 November 2013
    Library of Birmingham

    To celebrate the re-opening of the largest public library in Europe and its outstanding special collections The Library of Birmingham, Newman University College Typographic Hub at Birmingham City University and The Library of Lost Books have united to host a three-day conference on the theme of 'Resurrecting the Book'.

    The conference will run in conjunction with 'The Library of Lost Books Project', a major exhibition of 50 de-accessioned books which have been given new life as objects redesigned into works of art and which will form part of the opening festival for the new Library of Birmingham in 2013. The conference will include an opportunity to visit the 'The Library of Lost Books Project' and attend artists’ talks on re-working the books.

    With e-book downloads outstripping the purchase of hard copies, with libraries closing and discarding books and with the value of the book as physical object being increasingly questioned, this interdisciplinary conference will bring together academics, librarians, artists, creators, designers, and users of books to explore a wide variety of issues pertaining to the creation, design, construction, use, reuse, preservation, loss, and recovery of the material book, electronic and digitized books, and of collections and libraries.

    Programme and registration form now available!

    Queries: info@resurrectingthebook.org

    Further details are available at www.resurrectingthebook.org

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    The Future and the Medical Book conference: Collecting books
    Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4LE
    20 November 2013 - 3.15pm to 7pm

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has organised a series of five conferences to discuss the issues around the future and the medical book.

    Each of the five conferences will have a theme and will include short talks by experts, followed by discussion. The themes include the future of libraries and their collections, conservation, digital publishing and open access, as well as writing and collecting books. These conferences are open to anyone with an interest in the future of books in general, although the focus will be on medical books.

    Speakers include David Pearson, Giles Mandelbrote, Nicolas Barker, Kristian Jensen, Matija Strlic and Julia Foster.

    Each conference starts with registration at 3.15pm, an optional tour of the RCP building at 3.30pm, and talks and discussion from 4pm until 7pm. They are open to all, and the charge is £10 per event (free to RCP fellows and members). Buffet supper is available afterwards if booked in advance for £45 total per event

    Full information and booking forms are available online at: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/future-and-medical-book

    If you have any questions please contact enquiries@rcplondon.ac.uk.

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    10th Conference of the European Society for Textual Scholarship (ESTS 2013): Variance in textual scholarship and genetic criticism
    20 - 22 November 2013
    École normale supérieure, Paris

    Call for papers: Deadline for paper proposals: 1 June 2013

    The 10th conference of the European Society for Textual Scholarship will be organised at the École normale supérieure in Paris by the Institut des textes et manuscrits modernes (ITEM, UMR 8132) and the research team 'Textes, histoire et monuments, de l'Antiquitél au Moyen Âge' (THEMAM, UMR 7041 ARSCAN).

    Treated either as a deviation to be eliminated or as a creative transformation, variation is central to every form of textual scholarship. It is high time to confront the various conceptions of what constitutes a variation, to see what they have in common and what irreconcilable differences remain - though it would be paradoxical for a conference devoted to variance to aim at absolute uniformity.

    ESTS conferences are characterised by a combination of formal plenary sessions and traditional paper presentations in panel sessions with three speakers, followed by lively exchange, dialogue and interaction between speakers and audience in many small groups. There will also be an opportunity for poster presentations of current projects.

    We encourage submissions related to any of the following topics:

    The conference is organised according to a number of thematic sessions. Submissions are welcome on all topics related to the theme of the conference, regardless of linguistic contexts, time periods, geographic areas or types of documents and texts. This includes interdisciplinary perspectives from all branches of scholarly editing, as long as the focus of the proposals is on the guiding principles and practices of editorial scholarship. Graduate students are encouraged to participate.

    Please submit your proposal before 1 June 2013, by email to ests2013paris@gmail.com. You will be notified by 1 July 2013 whether your proposal has been accepted or not.

    Proposals for papers
    Abstracts in English (500 words maximum) are to be submitted to the organising committee, along with the presenter’s name, concise biography, address, telephone, email and institutional affiliation. Speakers will have 20 minutes to deliver their paper, leaving room for a 10-minute discussion.

    Proposals for panel sessions
    A typical panel should include 3 (exceptionally 4) speakers and one moderator (session chair). Each session lasts for 1 hour and a half, always allowing 30 minutes for questions and discussion. Proposers should submit the following elements:
    1. Session title and introduction (approximately 100 words)
    2. Titles of the papers
    3. Abstracts for each paper (500 words maximum)
    4. A short biography for each participant and for the panel chair (approximately 100 words)
    5. Institutional affiliation and address for each participant
    6. Audio-visual and other technical requirements

    Proposals for poster presentations
    There will be a poster gallery. A poster should be a visual representation and/or a demo of your material. The aim is to present information and initiate informal discussion among delegates. Posters should not exceed 80 cm × 120 cm. If you provide a photograph of yourself and a mobile phone number, other attendees will be able to get in touch with you. Please submit a one-page proposal with an overview of the poster and your contact details.

    Participation and registration
    Participants who contribute to the conference through a paper, a panel or a poster session need to pay the conference fee and have to be members in good standing of the European Society for Textual Scholarship for 2013 (except invited speakers). More information about registration and possibilities of accommodation will be published soon on a conference website. For more information about the ESTS, please see http://www.textualscholarship.eu/. Your current membership status is indicated at http://ests.huygensinstituut.nl/.

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    10th Conference of the European Society for Textual Scholarship (ESTS 2013): Variance in textual scholarship and genetic criticism/La variance en philologie et dans la critique génétique
    22 - 24 November 2013
    École Normale supérieure, Paris

    The 10th conference of the European Society for Textual Scholarship will be organised at the École normale supérieure in Paris by the Institut des textes et manuscrits modernes (ITEM, UMR 8132) and the research team 'Textes, histoire et monuments, de l'Antiquité au Moyen Âge' (THEMAM, UMR 7041 ARSCAN).

    Treated either as a deviation to be eliminated or as a creative transformation, variation is central to every form of textual scholarship. It is high time to confront the various conceptions of what constitutes a variation, to see what they have in common and what irreconcilable differences remain -- though it would be paradoxical for a conference devoted to variance to aim at absolute uniformity.

    ESTS conferences are characterised by a combination of formal plenary sessions and traditional paper presentations in panel sessions with three speakers, followed by lively exchange, dialogue and interaction between speakers and audience in many small groups. There will also be an opportunity for poster presentations of current projects.

    Further information about the conference and the venue will be available soon.

    Website: http://www.textualscholarship.eu/conference-2013.html

    Participation and registration
    Participants who contribute to the conference through a paper, a panel or a poster session need to pay the conference fee as well as be a member in good standing of the European Society for Textual Scholarship for 2013 (except invited speakers). Your current membership status is indicated at http://ests.huygensinstituut.nl/. More information about registration, accommodation and so on will be published soon on a dedicated conference website.

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    Text and Book in the Age of Swift
    23 November 2013
    St Peter’s College, Oxford

    Plenary Speakers
    Paddy Bullard (University of Kent)
    Valerie Rumbold (University of Birmingham)
    Abigail Williams (University of Oxford)

    Registration
    There will be a conference fee of £20 which will cover lunch, coffee, and tea. Participants will be invited to a reception at St Peter's to celebrate the publication of the Cambridge edition of Swift's Journal to Stella, edited by Abigail Williams, and a collection supplementary to the edition, Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book, edited by Paddy Bullard and James McLaverty.

    Registration There will be conference fee of £20 which will cover lunch, coffee, and tea. Participants will be invited to a reception at St Peter’s to celebrate the publication of the Cambridge edition of Swift’s Journal to Stella, edited by Abigail Williams, and a collection supplementary to the edition, Swift and the Eighteenth-Century Book, edited by Paddy Bullard and James McLaverty. The registration form can be downloaded at http://www.spc.ox.ac.uk/event/22/331/text_and_book_in_the_age_of_swift.html Please return the form by email to alison.wiblin@spc.ox.ac.uk or by post to Alison Wiblin, St Peter’s College, Oxford, OX1 2DL. Payment should be in the form a cheque made out to Abigail Williams, or money can be paid in directly to the appropriate bank account.

    All enquiries should be addressed to the Conference Coordinators, Abigail Williams and James McLaverty, at swift@spc.ox.ac.uk.

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    35th Annual Conference on Book Trade History: Working for the Booksellers: Authors and Publishers in Book Trade History
    24 - 25 November 2013
    Stationers’ Hall, Ave Maria Lane, London EC4M 7DD

    Organised by Robin Myers, Michael Harris & Giles Mandelbrote in association with The ABA Educational Trust

    The movement of manuscript into print can be a difficult as well as a rewarding process. Authors and publishers often have different agendas, as well as status, and the negotiations around money and content can lead to an uneasy relationship. This year’s speakers will describe the trials and tribulations of authors and their relations with booksellers, as well as delving into the dark corners of some rogue publishers.

    Programme
    Sunday 24 November
    10.00 Registration and coffee
    10.30 David Pearson: Elkanah Settle revisited
    11.45 Coffee
    12.15 Tom Lockwood: Lowlife publishing in London in the mid-eighteenth century
    1.30 Buffet lunch; the Clerk, William Alden, and Robin Myers will lead tours of the building
    3.00 Michael Burden: Making a living as a librettist in the 18th century
    4.15 Tea break
    4.30 Julian Pooley: 'An Irresistible Impulse to Proceed': The Problem of Authorship in the Works of John Nichols
    5.45 Reception at Stationers’ Hall (Please note: We should leave Stationers’ Hall promptly at 7p.m.)

    Monday 25 November
    10.00 Coffee
    10.30 Pat Rogers: Defoe and his publishers
    11.45 Coffee
    12.15 Matthew Sangster: 'Friends of Genius in Distress': The Royal Literary Fund, the Book Trade and Living by the Pen
    1.30 Lunch; weather permitting, Michael Harris will lead a tour of the area surrounding Stationers' Hall
    2.30 Peter Garside: Anonymity, Fiction, and the Book Trade: Was the case of Walter Scott unique?
    4.00 Conference continues with a visit to the Elkanah Settle collection at Guildhall, led by David Pearson
    Please note: We should vacate Stationers’ Hall promptly by 4 p.m.

    Notes
    The conference is organised by Michael Harris, Giles Mandelbrote and Robin Myers, in association with the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association Educational Trust. The conference will include a reception at Stationers’ Hall on Sunday evening and a visit to Guildhall Library to see the Elkanah Settle collection on Monday afternoon. The proceedings of previous conferences and a selection of antiquarian books will be available for purchase during the conference.

    Fees
    The conference fee includes coffee and lunch on both days, the reception on Sunday evening and the Guildhall Library visit. Registered students may apply for a limited number of reduced-rate places, sponsored by the Bibliographical Society.
    Conference fee: £90
    Conference fee, student: £55*
    Single-day fee: £55*
    Single-day fee, student: £40*
    * Limited availability in each category

    Early booking is recommended and places will be offered in order of receipt.

    For a booking form, or for more information, please contact: The Antiquarian Booksellers Association, Sackville House, 40 Piccadilly, London W1J 0DR, UK. Tel: +44 (0)20 7439 3118 Email: admin@aba.org.uk

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    Book History Research Network Study Day: The Art of Books
    6 December 2013
    Victoria and Albert Museum, London

    To register please email Catherine Armstrong: C.M.Armstrong@mmu.ac.uk

    Cost: £5 please bring a cheque or cash on the day to cover the cost of coffee/tea. NB The cost of lunch is not included. The organisers will direct you to reasonably priced, walk-able venues on the day.

    Directions to Seminar A in Research Department: Please enter the V&A via the Grand Entrance on Cromwell Road, and walk past the main information desk in the Grand Entrance then straight through the main shop area. As you exit the shop, take a left into the Hintze Sculpture Galleries and then take the first right through the Robert.H.N.Ho Family Foundation Gallery (Buddhist sculpture), towards the main V&A Cafe. Once you reach the Ceramic Staircase (opposite the Cafe) please walk to the very top landing (level 5), and ring the buzzer on the left hand side (marked Research Department).

    Programme
    10.30am: Registration, intro, coffee/tea
    10.45: Panel 1 - Materiality of early modern texts
    Daliah Bond. ‘Coarse, Crude and Unrefined’: The Scottish Chapbook and the Issue of Illustration
    Rebecca Emmett. Fonts of Knowledge: The significance of Typography in the study of the Marprelate Tracts
    Elaine Tierney. More Enduring Glory: Designing and Making The History of the Coronation of James II
    12.15pm: Lunch, visit exhibition and museum
    2.00: Panel 2 - Marketing, Books and the Empire
    Sandro Jung. Jeffery's Edition of Walpole's Castle of Otranto: Colour-printing, Marketing, and Visual Interpretation
    Sharon Murphy. 'The Books are to be deposited in Locked Book-Cases': the Book as a Physical Object in the East India Company’s Lending Libraries for Soldiers
    Anne Marie Hagan. An Aesthetic Pedagogy: the educational books of Thomas Nelson & Sons 1907-11
    3.30: coffee/tea
    3.45: panel 3 - Remaking the Book
    Siobhan Britton. Zines, Libraries and Issues around their Collection
    Egidija Čiricaitè, George Cullen & Chris Gibson. Between the Artist and Codex
    Finish 4.45

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    Printing mathematics in the early modern world
    16 December 2013
    All Souls College, Oxford

    Call for Papers
    The early modern period saw the printing, in large numbers, of mathematical tables, primers, textbooks and practical manuals, as well as the incorporation of mathematical notation into a wide range of works on other subjects. Algebraic notation, diagrams and even printed mathematical instruments all raised unusual problems for print. The development of appropriate layouts and conventions, the establishment of workable print-shop procedures, and the detection and management of error all potentially required distinctive solutions where the printing of mathematics was concerned. Those problems and their solutions are the subject of this one-day workshop, to be held in All Souls College, Oxford.

    Confirmed speakers:
    Katherine Hunt, Birkbeck
    Alexander Marr, Cambridge
    Robin Rider, Wisconsin
    Leo Rogers, Oxford
    Benjamin Wardhaugh, Oxford

    A limited number of places are available for observers. The cost will be £20, and will cover attendance at the conference sessions, with tea and coffee. Unfortunately accommodation cannot be provided for observers. Further information, including a draft programme, is available at www.benjaminwardhaugh.co.uk/printing/index.html

    To reserve a place, or for any enquiries, please contact benjamin.wardhaugh@all-souls.ox.ac.uk

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    European Middlebrow Cultures, 1880-1950: Reception, Translation, Circulation
    17 - 18 January 2014
    Royal Flemish Academy for the Humanities and Art, Brussels, Belgium

    Keynote speakers: Professor Kristin Bluemel, Monmouth University, Professor Christoph Ehland, Universitüt Paderborn, and Professor Dirk De Geest, Katholiek Universiteit Leuven

    This two-day conference intends to extend the well-established study of 20th-century anglophone middlebrow texts and authorship, to investigate how European literary cultures from 1880 may be examined for evidence of middlebrow writing, reading and production. This may be as a borrowed literary phenomenon through translation and assimilation, or as an indigenous pan-European cultural movement that has hitherto been obscured by a focus on modernist cultures. Since the 1980s, the study of middlebrow literary productions and authors has become a strongly emergent movement in anglophone literary research. 'Middlebrow' was first used to describe a particular stream of cultural production in the 1920s, first in British and Irish newspapers, and soon after in critical writing by notable cultural authorities such as Virginia Woolf, Arnold Bennett, and Q D Leavis. 'Middlebrow' was always a pejorative term, used to demarcate writing and reading, and initially also musical taste, from, simultaneously, the modernist and the lowbrow. Middlebrow books and authors were rejected by those who required intellectual innovation in their leisure reading, and who privileged challenge and complexity over enjoyment, familiarity and ease in what they read, and wrote. Readers of middlebrow writing had intellectual expectations, but these were moderate rather than extreme. Middlebrow writing was concerned with established literary traditions, and was 'an imaginative projection of lived experience conducive to a negotiation of identity and emotional 'entertainment' in the sense of providing sustenance' (Habermann 2010, 35). Yet this categorisation was fluid. 'Middlebrow could be a mode of reading, a stratum of society, a class of book, or a state of mind' (Macdonald 2011, 11).

    The importance of the study of middlebrow is derived from its close relationship, in the British context, with class, and, in the American context, with the rise of twentieth-century consumerism. These socio-historical dimensions offer a rich resource for the scholar in analysing many different aspects of middlebrow cultures, from different perspectives. Examining middlebrow texts will reveal a non-normative and non-restrictive understanding of literary dynamics in terms of how texts were constructed and how they were received. Most of the recent publications and conferences on middlebrow focus on anglophone texts, authors, publishing and marketing. There has been very little scholarly work published on non-anglophone middlebrow cultures, until the last five years: Van Boven et al (2008 & 2012), Sanders (2008), Van Boven (2009), Provenzano and Sindaco (2009), and Rymenants and Verstraeten (2009 & 2011). However, despite this recent work, without the input of research and scholarly discourse on middlebrow cultures in Europe, in languages other than English, the continuing study of middlebrow is artificially truncated by being limited to only authors working in English, and the interpretation of the anglophone world. An emerging community of researchers on middlebrow in Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and France (and undoubtedly in other European countries) need a forum to meet, discover each other's work and initiate new collaborations. This call for papers for a conference aims to attract a wide range of international researchers working on questions around middlebrow outside the anglophone sphere. These may include:

    The primary aim of the conference will be to offer a platform for these researchers to present their work and discuss methodologies, and network informally on subjects of mutual interest. Secondary aims will be to discern strands of middlebrow research that make connections across languages, cultures, historical moments, and authors and texts. Publication of a volume of scholarly essays is planned, drawing on papers presented at the forum, and by commissioning essays from specialists.

    By offering this contact forum for researchers in European middlebrow cultures, this conference will rebalance the anglophone dominance of the field, and make space to discuss research on European middlebrow cultures in the twentieth century. The conference will be open to papers on either of two strands of investigation: (1) research into European middlebrow cultural productions in languages other than English, and (2) research into the reception of anglophone middlebrow cultures in mainland Europe.

    The language of the conference will be English, for practical reasons, but informal translation and interpretation into and out of Dutch, German and French may be possible.

    We invite abstracts (of no more than 300 words, in any European language) that describe the background, subject and preliminary findings of your presentation. If you plan to present your paper in a language other than English, please provide an English translation of the abstract as well. Please send these to euromidd@gmail.com, by 1 September 2013, and include a contact email and postal address. We welcome abstracts from independent scholars as well as those from university researchers. Enquiries can also be sent to the above email address.

    Kate Macdonald, Universiteit Gent, Belgium
    Koen Rymenant, independent scholar
    Mathijs Sanders, Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen, Netherlands
    Erica Van Boven, Groningen Universiteit, Netherlands
    Pieter Verstraeten, Katholiek Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

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    Community Libraries: Connecting Readers in the Atlantic World, 1650-1850 - Libraries in the Atlantic World
    24 - 25 January 2014
    Liverpool

    We are delighted to announce the launch of a new AHRC-funded international research network on Community Libraries, which aims to establish a dynamic, interdisciplinary research forum to investigate the role of libraries in shaping communities in the long eighteenth century. Developed by Dr Mark Towsey (University of Liverpool) together with partners at Loyola University Chicago, the Newberry Library, and Dr Williams's Library (London), the Network will explain the emergence of libraries in the 'public sphere' between 1650 and 1850. We will assess the contribution made by libraries to the circulation and reception of print of all kinds, and to the forging of collective identities amongst local, national, and international communities of readers. In addition, the network aims to explore the emergence of libraries in comparative perspective, asking how far models of library provision and administration were disseminated, discussed, imitated, and challenged as they travelled between different social environments and political regimes.

    The Network will organise three two-day colloquia in the UK and the US. Each colloquium will focus on a specific theme, and will feature methodological workshops, work-in-progress presentations, pre-circulated papers, and roundtables.
    Colloquium 1: Libraries in the Atlantic World, to be held in Liverpool on 24-25 January, 2014
    Colloquium 2: Digital Approaches to Library History, to be held in Chicago on 30 May-1 June, 2014
    Colloquium 3: Libraries in the Community, to be held in London on 23-24 January 2015

    Call for proposals
    The project team invites initial expressions of interest from scholars interested in any element of the Community Libraries research programme. If you feel you can make a significant contribution to any or all of our colloquia, please send abstracts of 500 words, together with a brief summary of your research interests and career to date, to the Principal Investigator Dr Mark Towsey (towsey@liverpool.ac.uk) by 1 September 2013. For further information, please visit our website at www.communitylibraries.net.

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    The Future and the Medical Book conference: The digital book
    Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4LE
    30 January 2014 - 3.15pm to 7pm

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has organised a series of five conferences to discuss the issues around the future and the medical book.

    Each of the five conferences will have a theme and will include short talks by experts, followed by discussion. The themes include the future of libraries and their collections, conservation, digital publishing and open access, as well as writing and collecting books. These conferences are open to anyone with an interest in the future of books in general, although the focus will be on medical books.

    Speakers include David Pearson, Giles Mandelbrote, Nicolas Barker, Kristian Jensen, Matija Strlic and Julia Foster.

    Each conference starts with registration at 3.15pm, an optional tour of the RCP building at 3.30pm, and talks and discussion from 4pm until 7pm. They are open to all, and the charge is £10 per event (free to RCP fellows and members). Buffet supper is available afterwards if booked in advance for £45 total per event

    Full information and booking forms are available online at: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/future-and-medical-book

    If you have any questions please contact enquiries@rcplondon.ac.uk.

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    Lonely hearts, wedding bells and illicit pleasures: a far from sentimental journey of how London loved in print
    14 February 2014 - 6-7.30pm
    London

    This walk will carry you back through time to learn how the printing press often played a crucial role in the varying experiences of romance, love and relationships. Singletons and couples are invited to spend ninety minutes of Valentine's Day discovering how Londoners of the past might set about finding their match and hearing from the literature that recorded such journeys.

    In the company of Alice Ford-Smith (Bernard Quaritch Ltd), Lonely Hearts, Wedding Bells and Illicit Pleasures will uncover tales across the relationship spectrum. From Bloomsbury to the streets around Covent Garden, you will hear accounts of loneliness, friendship, love, passion, scandal, jealousy and exploitation. Books are behind them all, accompanied by the occasional librarian and many a person of business.

    The walk's meeting point will be the Wellcome Trust's headquarters on Euston Road and we will begin with viewing a display of related material from the Wellcome Library collections. After which, we will set out to explore the streets of London. The walk ends at approximately 7.30pm not far from Charing Cross. Please be ready for no breaks and the occasional saucy storyline!

    Numbers are limited to 20 people, and pre-booking is essential. Tickets, which are non-refundable, are £10 each. Please email Renae Satterley (r.satterley@middletemple.org.uk) to reserve your place. This event is open to all, so early booking is recommended.

    Meeting point:
    Wellcome Trust
    Gibbs Building
    215 Euston Road
    London NW1 2BE

    Tube: Euston/Euston Square/Warren Street

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    The Future and the Medical Book conference: Book preservation and conservation
    Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4LE
    27 February 2014 - 3.15pm to 7pm

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has organised a series of five conferences to discuss the issues around the future and the medical book.

    Each of the five conferences will have a theme and will include short talks by experts, followed by discussion. The themes include the future of libraries and their collections, conservation, digital publishing and open access, as well as writing and collecting books. These conferences are open to anyone with an interest in the future of books in general, although the focus will be on medical books.

    Speakers include David Pearson, Giles Mandelbrote, Nicolas Barker, Kristian Jensen, Matija Strlic and Julia Foster.

    Each conference starts with registration at 3.15pm, an optional tour of the RCP building at 3.30pm, and talks and discussion from 4pm until 7pm. They are open to all, and the charge is £10 per event (free to RCP fellows and members). Buffet supper is available afterwards if booked in advance for £45 total per event

    Full information and booking forms are available online at: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/future-and-medical-book

    If you have any questions please contact enquiries@rcplondon.ac.uk.

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    The Book of Fame[New!]
    18 March 2014 - 2-4pm
    Pitt Rivers Museum Lecture Room, Oxford

    An interdisciplinary workshop showcasing manuscripts, music, and artefacts from the Bodleian Library.

    Georgian and Romantic celebrity culture was fundamentally connected with the consumption and collection of material objects. From intimate and personal items such as locks of hair, manuscript letters and baby toys; to printed ephemera, such material reflected and shaped the relationship between famous individuals and their fans. This workshop offers a chance to inspect a series of unique items from this period, presented by scholars from the Bodleian Library and Oxford University in relation to ideas of fame and celebrity which remain compelling today.

    Website: http://www.torch.ox.ac.uk/book-fame

    Supported by Restoration to Reform: 1660- 1832, Bodleian Libraries, and The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities. For more information contactruth.scobie@history.ox.ac.uk.

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    The Future and the Medical Book conference: Writing books
    Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London, NW1 4LE
    20 March 2014 - 3.15pm to 7pm

    The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) has organised a series of five conferences to discuss the issues around the future and the medical book.

    Each of the five conferences will have a theme and will include short talks by experts, followed by discussion. The themes include the future of libraries and their collections, conservation, digital publishing and open access, as well as writing and collecting books. These conferences are open to anyone with an interest in the future of books in general, although the focus will be on medical books.

    Speakers include David Pearson, Giles Mandelbrote, Nicolas Barker, Kristian Jensen, Matija Strlic and Julia Foster.

    Each conference starts with registration at 3.15pm, an optional tour of the RCP building at 3.30pm, and talks and discussion from 4pm until 7pm. They are open to all, and the charge is £10 per event (free to RCP fellows and members). Buffet supper is available afterwards if booked in advance for £45 total per event

    Full information and booking forms are available online at: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/future-and-medical-book

    If you have any questions please contact enquiries@rcplondon.ac.uk.

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    Making the Most of Special Collections: unlocking secrets of early printed books [New!]
    21 March 2014
    Albert Sloman Library, University of Essex

    Organised by the Centre for Bibliographical History, University of Essex

    This half-day course will help all researchers whose work involves them studying early printed books. You will handle specimens from the Library’s Special Collections, learn how to describe them and to recognise how best to use all the information an early printed book can provide.

    Registration Fee: £65.00 - £100.00 depending on your eligibility for discounted fees

    For more information and to register, visit: http://www.essex.ac.uk/history/news_and_seminars/newsEvent.aspx?e_id=6253

    For enquiries, contact Dr David Rundle, Co-Director of the Centre, on cbh@essex.ac.uk

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    Illustration and Narrative Construction
    28 - 29 March 2014
    Université Paris-Diderot

    At a time of growing academic interest for the adaptation of fictional narratives across a range of different contemporary media (film, TV series, comic books, graphic novels), we would like to engage with illustration as the earliest form of visual adaptation of novelistic works.

    The general aim of this conference is to explore illustration in its specifically narrative dimension. The notion of narrative construction provides an interesting paradigm to analyse the relationship between text and image within illustrated works of fiction. Though each illustration may be said to have a narrative potential of its own which is revealed by the eye perusing it, it is the sequential dimension of narrative which will be our particular focus here.

    The object of the conference is to examine how a series of images accompanying a narrative does not simply illustrate separate moments singled out from the text but forms a visual narrative through its dynamic relationship with the text. We shall thus study the different processes at stake and the ways in which images, in their three-fold articulation to the work as a whole—namely to the passage which they illustrate, to what precedes and follows in the narrative, and to the sequence of interlinked images-- suggest a reading of a text and open up one of its narrative possibilities.

    The conference will focus on European novels from the early modern period to the present.

    Possible topics include:

    Submission for papers including an abstract (300 words maximum) and a short biographical notice should be sent to both Carole Cambray, Université Paris- Diderot (carolecambray@yahoo.fr) and Xavier Giudicelli, Université de Reims-Champagne Ardenne (xgiudicelli@yahoo.fr)

    Deadline for proposals : 10 September 2013.

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    Transforming the early modern Republic of Letters: Literature, Learning, Logic, Books[New!]
    31 March 2014 - 2 April 2014
    All Souls College and Maison Française, Oxford

    Participants
    Irene Backus (University of Geneva)
    Chimene Bateman (New College, Oxford)
    Ann Blair (Harvard University)
    Warren Boutcher (Queen Mary, London)
    Robin Briggs (All Souls College, Oxford)
    Colin Burrow (All Souls College, Oxford)
    Terence Cave (St John’s College, Oxford)
    Tim Chesters (Clare College, Cambridge)
    Richard Cooper (Brasenose College, Oxford)
    Nicholas Cronk (St Edmund Hall, Oxford)
    Nicholas Davidson (St Edmund Hall, Oxford)
    Marie-Luce Demonet (Université de Tours)
    Ingrid De Smet (University of Warwick)
    Cristina Dondi (University of Oxford CERL)
    Frédéric Gabriel (CNRS/ENS de Lyon)
    Ian Gadd (Bath Spa University)
    Emma Herdman (University of St Andrews)
    Howard Hotson (St Anne’s College, Oxford)
    Jill Kraye (Warburg Institute, London)
    Frank Lestringant (Sorbonne, Paris)
    Christophe Lüthy (Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen)
    Jan Machielsen (New College, Oxford)
    Ian Maclean (All Souls College, Oxford)
    Scott Mandelbrote (Peterhouse, Cambridge)
    Alexander Marr (Trinity Hall, Cambridge)
    Michael Moriarty (Peterhouse, Cambridge)
    Paul Nelles (Carleton University, Canada)
    David Norbrook (Merton College, Oxford)
    John O'Brien (Durham University)
    Richard Parish (St Catherine's College, Oxford)
    Martine Pécharman (CNRS, Paris)
    Will Poole (New College, Oxford)
    Richard Serjeantson (Trinity College, Cambridge)
    Alexis Tadié (Sorbonne, Paris)
    Rowan Tomlinson (University of Bristol)
    Helen Watanabe-O’Kelly (Exeter College, Oxford)
    Valerie Worth-Stylianou (Trinity College, Oxford)

    Panels on book history, the history of science, logic, gender, religion, Montaigne

    Organisers: Neil Kenny, All Souls College, Richard Scholar, Oriel College, and Wes Williams, St Edmund Hall

    To register, please visit http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk, then click on Conferences & Events (left of screen), then Modern Languages

    Poster: http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/isih/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Republic-of-Letters-Poster.pdf

    Please address any queries to Humaira (email: fellows.secretary@all-souls.ox.ac.uk)

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    Early Career Research Network Symposium: Editing[New!]
    11 April 2014 - 10.30-17.00
    Conference Centre, University of Sussex

    A British Academy funded networking event for early career researchers, hosted by the University of Sussex, focussing on the issue of editing. The day will consider: questions of editing manuscripts; editions of literary works; editions of letters; editions of documentary sources; collation; annotation; digital editions; organising collaborative projects; and any other relevant issues.

    The keynote speaker will be David McKitterick (University of Cambridge, F.B.A.).

    Lunch and refreshments will be provided.

    Please contact Simon Davies for more information: S.F.Davies@sussex.ac.uk

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    AHRC Network: Voices and Books, 1500-1800 (workshop 1)[New!]
    12 April 2014
    Conference Room, Royal Northern College of Music, 124 Oxford Road Manchester M13 9RD

    Co-led by Professor Jennifer Richards (Newcastle University) and Professor Richard Wistreich (Royal Northern College of Music)

    This is an AHRC-funded network of early modern scholars based in the UK and US (literary scholars, linguists, historians, musicologists) and partners (British Library; City Library, Newcastle; National Early Music Association UK; The Reading Experience Database; Seven Stories, National Centre for Children's Books) who are committed to recovering the history of reading aloud and listening to books. In 2014 we will be organising three workshops, to be held at the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, Strathclyde University, Glasgow and the British Library, London. And in 2015 we will host an International Conference on Reading Aloud 1500-2015 at City Library, Newcastle. Please see below for an invitation to attend our first workshop in Manchester. For more information, see our website: http://research.ncl.ac.uk/voicesandbooks/

    This event is free and open to anyone who would like to come. If you are interested in attending, however, please contact the Network Co-ordinator: Helen.Stark@ncl.ac.uk. (N.B. places may be limited). Some small bursaries may be available to assist doctoral students and ECRs with the costs of attendance.

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    Scientiae Vienna 2014
    23 - 25 April 2014
    University of Vienna, Austria

    Keynote Speakers: Thomas Wallnig (University of Vienna) and Howard Hotson (University of Oxford)

    Call for papers

    The deadline for all abstracts is 15 October 2013

    Paper and panel proposals are invited for Scientiae 2014, the third annual conference on the emergent knowledge practices of the early modern period (ca. 1450-1750). The conference will take place on the 23-25 April 2014 at the University of Vienna in Austria, building upon the success of Scientiae 2012 (Simon Fraser University) and Scientiae 2013 (Warwick), each of which brought together more than 100 scholars from around the world.

    The premise of this conference is that knowledge during the period of the Scientific Revolution was inherently interdisciplinary, involving complex mixtures of practices and objects which had yet to be separated into their modern “scientific” hierarchies. Our approach, subsequently, needs to be equally wide-ranging, involving Biblical exegesis, art theory, logic, and literary humanism; as well as natural philosophy, alchemy, occult practices, and trade knowledge. Attention is also given to mapping intellectual geographies through the tools of the digital humanities. Scientiae is intended for scholars working in any area of early-modern intellectual culture, but is centred around the emergence of modern natural science. The conference offers a forum for the dissemination of research, acts as a catalyst for new investigations, and is open to scholars of all levels.

    Topics may include, but are not limited to:

    Abstracts for individual papers of 25 minutes should be between 250 and 350 words in length. For panel sessions of 1 hour and 45 minutes, a list of speakers (with affiliations), as well as a 500-word abstract, is required. Roundtable discussions or other formats may be accepted at the discretion of the organizing committee. All applicants are also required to submit a brief biography of 150 words of less. Abstracts must be submitted through our online submission form.

    If you have any questions, please contact the conference convenor, Vittoria Feola (vittoria.feola@meduniwien.ac.at).

    The 2014 conference will be held in the Juridicum at the University of Vienna, a modern conference building which is part of the ancient University of Vienna, founded in 1365. The conference will take place in the historic city centre of one of Europe’s most beautiful capitals, easy to reach by plane and train.

    Book your flight to Scientiae 2014 online at www.austrian.com and save 15% on all applicable fares! To do so, simply enter the following code in the eVoucher field on the Austrian homepage booking-engine: SCIENT14. The following conditions apply: 1. the booking period is now until April 26, 2014; 2. valid for flights Vienna and return as of April 16, 2014 until May 3, 2014 (final date for return flight) on OS operated flights.

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    Thinking with Things, 1500-1940[New!]
    25 April 2014 - 9am-6pm
    Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences, and Humanities, University of Cambridge

    An interdisciplinary material culture workshop for graduate students

    Keynote speaker: Dr Spike Bucklow (Hamilton Kerr Institute, Cambridge)
    Closing Remarks: Dr Katy Barrett (Royal Museums, Greenwich)

    Call for papers

    Research students from any discipline within the arts, social sciences, and humanities are invited to submit proposals for papers, and/or panels of three papers, that consider how ‘things’ can put a new perspective on the past. This workshop is affiliated with the ‘Things: Comparing Material Cultures’ seminar series at CRASSH http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/programmes/things

    Over the past thirty years, the ‘material turn’ has reformed the way in which many historians approach the past, but attention to the ‘stuff’ of history has concerned archaeologists, art historians, anthropologists and sociologists for some time. From shoes to anatomical specimens, from people to paintings, from durable glass and porcelain to fragile fabrics and ephemeral foodstuffs, a vast array of ‘things’ are now subject to the researcher’s gaze, offering valuable windows into the experience of historical actors and the objects that mediated past social and cultural interactions.

    The recognition that material objects are worthy subjects of scholarship is the premise of the successful CRASSH Graduate Seminar ‘Things’. Now in its third year, ‘Things’ began life as a series whose primary object was the study of material culture in the so-called consumerist ‘long eighteenth century’, taking the format of regular sessions of two papers on related themes and/or objects presented by scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds. Today, the series incorporates a longer chronological span, but retains its original focus on the material lives of the past and continues to attract scholars of all stripes to speak on a range of topics.

    The aim of this workshop is to give graduate students (at both PhD and Masters level) and early career scholars a chance to present their work and to participate in discussion in the lively, welcoming and highly interdisciplinary space that ‘Things’ has created. Following the model of the ‘Things’ series, the conference will be structured around a series of panels that focus on particular types of objects or particular thematic questions (such as issues of methodology or themes like industrialisation).

    We encourage applications for 20-minute papers (or panels of 3 such papers) along the following themes (broadly construed) in relation to the period 1500-1940:

    Abstracts of no more than 300 words, accompanied by a brief biographical note of no more than 100 words stating degree status and any institutional affiliation, should be sent to ThinkingThingsCRASSH@gmail.com by 3rd March 2014. This conference is being organised by Lesley Steinitz, Michelle Wallis and Mike Ashby (University of Cambridge).

    This workshop has been made possible due to funding from the University of Cambridge History Faculty, and organisational assistance and facilities from CRASSH. We are unable to cover travel or accommodation costs for speakers, though we are happy to help book affordable accommodation for those participants that require it. We would encourage participants to request accommodation early, as college guest rooms are in high demand.

    Details: http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/25524

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    Textuality in Transition: A workshop on editing texts from medieval Britain[New!]
    20 - 21 May 2014
    St Anne's College, Oxford

    In 2014, the Early English Text Society will celebrate the 150th anniversary of its founding. As part of the celebrations of the 150th birthday of the Society, there will be a workshop for graduate students and recently postdoctoral scholars: Textuality in Transition: A workshop on editing texts from medieval Britain. Textuality in Transition will introduce the theory and practice of editing to a new generation of students of English language, literature and manuscripts studies, to enable them to take up editing projects for themselves. It will involve lectures, discussions and practical exercises in editing in groups. The course will be led by the members of the Council of the Early English Text Society and others, including Richard Beadle, Julia Boffey, Richard Dance, Susan Irvine, William Marx, Andy Orchard, Ad Putter, Jeremy Smith and H. L. Spencer. Textuality in Transition will be held at St Anne’s College, Oxford, UK, from 1.30 p.m. on 20 May till 4.30p.m. on 21 May 2014. Dinner on 20 May and lunch on 21 May will be provided free.

    For information, see: http://www.eets.org.uk/ under the heading '2014 Anniversary'.

    To register online, click on: http://www.oxforduniversitystores.co.uk/browse/extra_info.asp?compid=1&modid=1&deptid=110&catid=2024&prodvarid=707

    Participants must make their own arrangements for accommodation. For some options, see: http://www.universityrooms.com/en/city/oxford/home

    The cost to take part will be £14 for members of the Early English Text Society or £24 for non-members. To join the Early English Text Society, for £30 a year, download membership forms from: http://www.eets.org.uk/

    Please contact Daniel Wakelin, daniel.wakelin@ell.ox.ac.uk, for further details.

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    Books in Motion in Early Modern Europe: Beyond Production, Circulation and Consumption
    28 - 31 May 2014
    Erfurt/Gotha (Germany)

    This international conference is designed as a reflection on the history of the early modern book in Europe, and aims to open discussion between experts that are working in the interdisciplinary field of book history. The conference willtake place in the Gotha Research Centre of the University of Erfurt. This centre houses the rich Research Library, containing one of the most significant collections of early modern books and prints in Germany. (See: https://www.uni-erfurt.de/en/gotha-research-centre-of-the-university-of-erfurt/profile/ ). The conference is supported by the German Research Association (DFG), Erfurt University and Utrecht University.

    As the conference’s title assumes, Books in Motion in Early Modern Europe. Beyond Production, Circulation and Consumption is aimed to focus on all three main research fields of book history: production, circulation and consumption. While providing an opportunity and forum for reviewing current and past developments in these often separated fields, we also set out to highlight the connections between them. To achieve this aim, we will concentrate especially on the interplay between the three stages of early modern book culture, established by the actions and motives of its participants (sociality), the characteristics of the used and produced spaces (spatiality), and the variety of the publications (materiality). To put it differently: the focus lies on the human networks of producing, distributing and consuming; on the interconnectivity of geography, distance and space that shaped early modern production, circulation, and consumption; and on the wide range and function of contemporary published material (in manuscript and print) characterized by aspects of production, circulation and consumption.

    The conference program includes the following speakers from 10 different countries: Dr. Giles Bergel (Oxford, United Kingdom); Dr. Jürgen Beyer (Tartu, Estonia); Dr. Stephen Colclough (Bangor, United Kingdom; Prof. Dr. Arjan van Dixhoorn (Gent, Belgium / Utrecht, The Netherlands); Dr. Johannes Frimmel (Munich, Germany); Dr. Esther van Gelder (Utrecht, The Netherlands); Dr. Andreas Golob (Graz, Austria); Dr. Michiel van Groesen (Amsterdam, The Netherlands); Prof. Dr. Adrian Johns (Chicago, USA); Dr. Joop W. Koopmans (Groningen, The Netherlands); Sarah Laseke, M.A. (Oxford, United Kingdom); Dr. Anu Lepp (Tartu, Estonia); Dr. Nelleke Moser (Amsterdam, The Netherlands); Dr. Leigh Penman (Oxford, United Kingdom); Prof. Dr. Joad Raymond (London, United Kingdom); Dr. Benito Rial Costas (Madrid, Spain); Dr. Geoffrey Roper (London, United Kingdom): Dr. Massimo Rospocher (Leeds, United Kingdom); Dr. Orlin Sabev (Sofia, Bulgaria); Dr. Kristii Viiding (Tartu, Estonia); Dr. Malcolm Walsby (Rennes, France); Dr. Daniel Bellingradt (Erfurt, Germany); Dr. Jeroen Salman (Utrecht, The Netherlands).

    The final program of the conference is about to be announced soon.

    For further enquiries about the conference please contact the organizers: Daniel Bellingradt (University of Erfurt) daniel.bellingradt@uni-erfurt.de and Jeroen Salman (Utrecht University) j.salman@uu.nl

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    Community Libraries: Connecting Readers in the Atlantic World, 1650-1850 - Digital Approaches to Library History
    30 May - 1 June 2014
    Chicago

    We are delighted to announce the launch of a new AHRC-funded international research network on Community Libraries, which aims to establish a dynamic, interdisciplinary research forum to investigate the role of libraries in shaping communities in the long eighteenth century. Developed by Dr Mark Towsey (University of Liverpool) together with partners at Loyola University Chicago, the Newberry Library, and Dr Williams's Library (London), the Network will explain the emergence of libraries in the 'public sphere' between 1650 and 1850. We will assess the contribution made by libraries to the circulation and reception of print of all kinds, and to the forging of collective identities amongst local, national, and international communities of readers. In addition, the network aims to explore the emergence of libraries in comparative perspective, asking how far models of library provision and administration were disseminated, discussed, imitated, and challenged as they travelled between different social environments and political regimes.

    The Network will organise three two-day colloquia in the UK and the US. Each colloquium will focus on a specific theme, and will feature methodological workshops, work-in-progress presentations, pre-circulated papers, and roundtables.
    Colloquium 1: Libraries in the Atlantic World, to be held in Liverpool on 24-25 January, 2014
    Colloquium 2: Digital Approaches to Library History, to be held in Chicago on 30 May-1 June, 2014
    Colloquium 3: Libraries in the Community, to be held in London on 23-24 January 2015

    Call for proposals
    The project team invites initial expressions of interest from scholars interested in any element of the Community Libraries research programme. If you feel you can make a significant contribution to any or all of our colloquia, please send abstracts of 500 words, together with a brief summary of your research interests and career to date, to the Principal Investigator Dr Mark Towsey (towsey@liverpool.ac.uk) by 1 September 2013. For further information, please visit our website at www.communitylibraries.net.

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    Textual Bibliography for Modern Foreign Languages[New!]
    2 June 2014
    Conference Centre, British Library, London

    Call for papers
    We are seeking four or five papers of approx. 30 minutes each, one at 11.15 a.m. and the others after lunch, with ample time for discussion after each paper.

    Papers dealing with any aspect of printing and book production in Continental Eastern and Western Europe are warmly invited, as are papers dealing with other aspects of historical bibliography, editing, and the history of the book and reading.

    Papers giving an account of work in progress or offers to introduce discussion of bibliographical interest are a long- standing feature of the seminar.

    Please let us know by the end of April if you are willing to give a paper.

    We should be grateful if you would send us the names and addresses of potential new participants in the seminar, especially postgraduate students.

    Barry Taylor (barry.taylor@bl.uk; tel 020 7412 7576) Susan Reed (susan.reed@bl.uk; tel 020 7412 7572)

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    A Changing Book Market? Spain and Portugal, 1601-1650
    5 - 6 June 2014
    Centre for the History of the Media, University College Dublin, Ireland

    Call for papers
    The marketplace for print in Spain, Portugal and the New World witnessed many profound transformations in the first half of the seventeenth century. Overall, there was a dramatic increase in the output of the presses, while patterns of production shifted significantly from what had been set in the preceding century. The period witnessed the growth of an increasingly vibrant news culture. Appetites for recreational reading also began to change, seen not least in the number of printed plays available for purchase.

    Though attracting far less scholarly attention, perhaps the most noteworthy development of all was the maturing use of the press to service government and the legal profession. This conference will focus broadly on the industry and culture of print, and ask just how the Iberian book world of the first half of the seventeenth century compares with what had gone before and what would follow.

    The conference will take place in Dublin on the 5 -6 June 2014. It will coincide with the launch of volumes 2 and 3 of the UCD Iberian Book Project which cover this period. Confirmed speakers include two of the most distinguished figures in Golden Age Studies, Professor Don Cruickshank and Professor Henry Ettinghausen.

    Papers are warmly invited from scholars from any academic background interested in the industry or culture of the Iberian book. The principal and preferred language of the conference will be English. However, papers may be delivered in Spanish or Portuguese if pre-circulated. Papers on less well explored areas of study such as legal print or illustration are especially welcome.

    The Call for Papers is now open. Potential contributors are asked to submit a title and brief outline of their paper (250 words) to Dr Alejandra Ulla Lorenzo (alejandra.ullalorenzo@ucd.ie ) before Friday 29 November 2013.

    The Conference has been made possible thanks to the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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    Culture Wars 1900-1950[New!]
    14 June 2014
    Sheffield Hallam University

    What was meant by 'culture' in the period 1900-1950? Whose culture was it and did all walks of life have a culture? How was culture contested? This is an inter-disciplinary conference that looks beyond the purely literary to encompass film, journalism, publishing, libraries, etc. We particularly welcome papers addressing cultural change over time, and that focus on the beginning and end of the 1900-1950 period.

    Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

    Sheffield Hallam University is home to the 'Readerships and Literary Cultures 1900-1950 Collection', a unique resource of over 1000 novels, most in early editions, which reflect the wide range of literary taste in the period. The conference will include a session on the use of the collection as a research resource.

    The Collection is part of the Middlebrow Network: http://www.middlebrow-network.com/SpecialCollection.aspx. Our reading blog: http://reading19001950.wordpress.com/

    Please send abstracts of approx. 250 words for 20 minute papers to Dr Erica Brown (e.brown@shu.ac.uk), by 7 March 2014. Proposals for innovative forms of presentation or workshop are also welcome: please contact Erica Brown if you would like to discuss this or have any other queries. Participants will be notified by 17 March 2014.

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    London Palaeography Summer School
    16 - 20 June 2014
    London

    The London Palaeography Summer School is a series of intensive courses in Palaeography and Diplomatic. Courses range from a half to two days duration and are given by experts in their respective fields from a wide range of institutions. Subject areas include Latin palaeography, English, German and Greek palaeography, history of scripts, illuminated manuscripts, vernacular editing and liturgical and devotional manuscripts.

    Applications for LRBS and LIPSS will open on 6 January 2014. Questions? Contact the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London at IESEvents@sas.ac.uk or +44 020 7862 8679

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    Books and Technique across the Globe before the 20th Century
    18 - 20 June 2014
    Bibliothèque centrale du Conservatoire national des arts et métiers, Cité des Sciences et de l'Industrie, Ecole des Ponts ParisTech, Collège de France (Institut des civilisations, site cardinal-Lemoine)

    Organisational committee : Thérèse Charmasson (CRHST-Universciences), Konstantinos Chatzis (LATTS/ENPC-UMLV-CNRS), Isabelle Gautheron (ENPC), Liliane Hilaire-Pérez (Univ. Paris-7-ICT/EHESS-CAK), Soline Lau-Suchet (BULAC), Catherine Masteau (ENPC), Emmanuelle Minault-Richomme (Cnam-Service commun de la documentation), Valérie Nègre (ENSAPLV-AUSser), Allan Potofsky (Univ. Paris-7-LARCA), Delphine Spicq (Collège de France-Bibliothèque IHEC), Koen Vermeir (SPHERE CNRS/Univ. Paris-7).

    Supporting institutions: Bibliothèque du Conservatoire national des arts et métiers, Bibliothèque de l'Ecole des Ponts ParisTech (ENPC), Centre Alexandre Koyré (CNRS/EHESS), Centre Maurice Halbwachs (CNRS-EHESS), CRHST Cité des Sciences et de l'Industrie, Institut des hautes études chinoises du Collège de France, Ecole nationale supérieure d'Architecture Paris La Villette, Identités-Cultures-Territoires ICT (Univ. P7), INALCO (BULAC), Laboratoire de Recherche sur les Cultures Anglophones LARCA (Univ. P7), Laboratoire SPHERE (CNRS/Univ. P7), Laboratoire Techniques, Territoires et Sociétés (ENPS-UMLV-CNRS), UMR AUSser (CNRS/Université Paris-Est).

    Scientific Committee: Yahovi Akakpo (Univ. Lomé), Frédéric Barbier (EPHE), Bruno Belhoste (Univ. P1-CRHM), Patrice Bret (EHESS-CAK), Eric Brian (CMH-EHESS), Pascal Brioist (Univ. Tours-CESR), Annie Charon (Ecole des Chartes), Roger Chartier (Collège de France), Karine Chemla (SPHERE, CNRS-Univ. P7), Pascal Crozet (SPHERE, CNRS-Univ. P7), Antony Garcia Delmar (Univ. Barcelone), Jean-Pierre Drège (EPHE-CRCAO, CNRS), Emilie d'Orgeix, (Université de Bordeaux 3), William Eamon (instit. ?), Nicolas Fiévé (EPHE-CRCAO, CNRS), Susan Finding (UFR Lettres et Langues, Université de Poitiers), Irina Gouzévitch (CMH-EHESS), Annick Horiuchi (Univ. P7-CRCAO, CNRS), Christian Jacob (EHESS-CAK), Catherine Jami (SPHERE, CNRS-Univ. P7), Hélène Lipstadt (DOM Research Lab/Center for Design Organization Mediac/Linz University of Arts and Design), Robert Mankin (Univ. P7-LARCA), Chuan Hui Mau (Univ. Tsing Hua, Taïwan), Alain Mercier (Cnam), John Moffet (Bibliothèque du Needham Institut, Univ. Camb! ridge ), Jeanne Peiffer (CAK-EHESS/CNRS), Antoine Picon (LATTS-Harvard University), Madeleine Pinault-Sorensen (Ecole du Louvre), Steven Pincus (Yale University), David Rabouin (SPHERE, CNRS-Univ. P7), Dinah Ribard (CRH-EHESS), Daniel Roche (Collège de France), Will Slauter (Univ. P8), Pamela H. Smith (Columbia Univ.), Valérie Tesnière (BDIC/EHESS-CRH), Hélène Vérin (CAK-EHESS/CNRS), Michèle Virol (Univ. Rouen-Centre R. Mousnier), Pierre-étienne Will (Collège de France), Ting Xu (Univ. Dublin).

    Presentation
    The history of technical books constitutes a new field of historical study, and one that has received little scholarly attention, owing to the marginal place to which the history of technical knowledge has been relegated. Consider the Descriptions of the arts and crafts commissioned by the highest levels of the French state during the old regime, or the manuals for public servants that circulated in the Chinese empire, or the multiple treatises used to train generations of engineers, or the various technical guides aimed at improving the practices of artisans and farmers. Such examples suggest that technical books make up an extraordinarily rich category of literature whose common characteristics can be identified, and which circulated across the globe

    The goal of this conference is to address the lacuna in the historiography and to examine the relationship between the economy of the book trades and the world of technical knowledge and skills. In so doing, we will analyze the category of the technical book in its multiple forms, functions, modes of diffusion and appropriation in all periods before the 20th century.

    A closer examination of technical literature and its relation to specific practices in different fields offers an opportunity to challenge traditional historical categories and established typologies. Works that seem very specific ­ practical how-to books, instruction booklets, and commercial brochures ­ share characteristics with other forms for communicating knowledge, including published course lectures, textbooks, lithographs, mimeographs, treatises, dictionaries, encyclopedias, journals, travel literature, etc. This diversity invites us to study the place of these publications in the wider publishing world as well as their relationship to the book as a material object through a closer examination of their form and content.

    What is the role of these publications in shaping knowledge? Who are the principal actors involved? What activities lead them to formalize technical practices so that they may be transcribed and diffused in book form? Why make technical knowledge public and why use a format of broad diffusion intended for a wider readership? What are the conditions of production and distribution of these publications? Who reads them and how? What type of a reception and what kind of a public do they find? This conference will seek answers to all of these questions.

    Contributions must be limited to periods before the 20th century, without geographical restrictions. Preferably, they will focus on one of the following themes:

    Article proposals (title and summaries accompanied by a CV) should be sent to the following address, before 15 October 2013: livreettechniques@gmail.com

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    The St Andrews Book Conference for 2014: Lost Books
    19 - 21 June 2014
    University of St Andrews

    Questions of survival and loss bedevil the study of early printed books. Many early publications are not particularly rare, but others are very scarce, and many have disappeared altogether. We can infer this from the improbably large number of books that survive in only one copy, and it is confirmed by the many references in contemporary documents to books that cannot now be identified in surviving book collections.

    This conference will address the issue of how far this corpus of lost books can be reconstructed from contemporary documentation, and how this emerging perception of the actual production of the early book trade -- rather than those books that are known from modern library collections -- should impact on our understanding of the industry and contemporary reading practice.

    Papers are invited on any aspects of this subject: particular texts, classes of texts or authors particularly impacted by poor rates of survival; lost books revealed in contemporary lists or inventories; the collections of now dispersed libraries; deliberate and accidental destruction. Attention will also be given to ground-breaking recent attempts to estimate statistically the whole corpus of production in the first centuries of print by calculating rates of survival.

    The papers given at this conference will form the basis of a volume in the Library of the Written Word.

    The call for papers is now open. Those interested in giving a paper should contact Dr Flavia Bruni (fb323@st-andrews.ac.uk) at St Andrews, offering a brief description of their likely contribution.

    The call for papers will close on 30 November 2013.

    Website: http://www.ustc.ac.uk/?p=1119

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    London Rare Books School (2014)
    23 - 27 June and 30 June - 4 July 2014
    London

    A series of five-day, intensive courses on a variety of book-related subjects. Our courses are taught by internationally renowned scholars using the unrivalled library and museum resources of London, including the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and Senate House Libraries.

    Applications for LRBS and LIPSS will open on 6 January 2014. Questions? Contact the Institute of English Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London at IESEvents@sas.ac.uk or +44 020 7862 8679

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    Peversions of Paper[New!]
    28 June 2014
    Birkbeck College, London

    Library copies of soft-focus S/M blockbuster Fifty Shades of Grey were recently found to carry traces of cocaine and the herpes virus; a reminder, if one were needed, that our relationship with the page involves more than just the eye. Current scholarly emphasis on the material text has revealed that uses of reading matter extend well beyond reading itself, promising to bring to light other kinds of tactile, intimate and sometimes strange connections between bodies and books. Perversions of Paper is a one-day symposium investigating the outer limits of our interactions with books and with paper. It considers unorthodox engagements with texts, from cherishing or hoarding them to mutilating and desecrating them, from wearing them to chewing them, and from inhaling their scent to erasing their content. Perversion may apply to deviations from normal usage but also to our psychological investments in paper. To talk of having a fetish for books is common, but is there more to this than merely well-worn cliché? What part do books and other written artefacts play in our imaginary and psychic lives, and what complex emotional attachments do we develop towards them? Also, how might literary studies or cultural history register these impulses and acts; what kind of methodologies are appropriate?

    This conference invites reflections on perverse uses of - and relationships with paper and parchment. We welcome proposals from a range of historical periods and disciplinary backgrounds, and from postgraduate students, as well as from more established academics. Contributors are invited to consider bookish and papery aberrations from any number of angles, including but not limited to: the defacing or mutilation of writing; the book as sculpture or art medium; 'upcycling' or re-purposing; the book or manuscript as a fetish object; pathologies or obsessions related to paper; psychologies of book collecting; bibliophilia and bibliophobia; book crazes, the tactility or sensuality of paper and manuscripts; books, libraries and archives as sources of contagion, or as the focus of terror or abjection.

    Deadline for proposals: March 30th 2014. Please email abstracts of no more than 200 words to g.partington@bbk.ac.uk

    This event is jointly organised by the Birkbeck Material Texts Network and the Archive Futures Network

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    The Instability of Intellectual Property (The Sixth Annual ISHTIP Workshop 2014)
    2 - 4 July 2014
    Uppsala University, Sweden

    Hosted by the Department of Archival Science, Library & Information Science and Museology & Heritage Studies (ALM), Uppsala University in collaboration with the Faculty of Law, Uppsala University and Linküping University

    The International Society for the History and Theory of Intellectual Property (ISHTIP: http://www.ishtip.org/) invites to its sixth annual workshop. This time it will be held at Uppsala University and focus on the ways in which intellectual property moves and travels across disciplinary, legal, linguistic, and geopolitical borders. Instability can refer to the way intellectual property law seeks to pin down a legal regime for increasingly unstable works. Instability can refer to the interdisciplinarity of intellectual property scholarship, as it tries to navigate and expand across and beyond disciplinary traditions. Instability can refer to the many processes of cultural and legal translation and transculturation involved in flows of culture. We encourage a broad variety of historical and/or contemporary topics that explore interdisciplinary and international aspects of intellectual property, engaging with the diversity and plurality of legal and linguistic traditions. We are particularly interested in receiving contributions that deploy a self reflexive epistemological outlook on the study of intellectual property.

    Possible topics include but are not limited to:

    Submissions of paper proposals should be made to ishtip2014@gmail.com and include a 300 word abstract, a one paragraph author bio and two page CV. Deadline for submission of proposals is January 15, 2014.

    Please note that after the workshop, presenters will be invited to submit revised papers for publication in a special issue of the peer-reviewed, open access journal Culture Unbound http://www.cultureunbound.ep.liu.se

    Thanks to the generous support of The Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences (Riksbankens Jubileumsfond) http://www.rj.se/english/about_rj the workshop is free of charge.

    For more information, please visit http://www.ishtip.org/uppsala2014

    Organizers
    Marianne Dahlén marianne.dahlen@jur.uu.se
    Eva Hemmungs Wirtén ehw@abm.uu.se
    Martin Fredriksson martin.fredriksson@liu.se

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    Error and Print Culture, 1500-1800[New!]
    5 July 2014
    Centre for the Study of the Book, University of Oxford

    Call for Papers
    'Pag. 8. lin. 7. for laughing, reade, languishing.'
    Richard Bellings, A Sixth Booke to the Countesse of Pembrokes Arcadia (1624), 'Errata'

    Recent histories of the book have replaced earlier narratives of technological triumph and revolutionary change with a more tentative story of continuities with manuscript culture and the instability of print. An abstract sense of technological agency has given way to a messier world of collaboration, muddle, money, and imperfection. Less a confident stride towards modernity, the early modern book now looks stranger: not quite yet a thing of our world.

    What role might error have in these new histories of the hand-press book? What kinds of error are characteristic of print, and what can error tell us about print culture? Are particular forms of publication prone to particular mistakes? How effective were mechanisms of correction (cancel-slips; errata lists; over-printing; and so on), and what roles did the printing house corrector perform? Did readers care about mistakes? Did authors have a sense of print as an error-prone, fallen medium, and if so, how did this inform their writing? What links might we draw between representations of error in literary works (like Spenser's Faerie Queene), and the presence of error in print? How might we think about error and retouching or correcting rolling-press plates? What is the relationship between engraving historians' continuum of difference, and letter-press bibliographers' binary of variant/invariant? Was there a relationship between bibliographical error and sin, particularly in the context of the Reformation? How might modern editors of early modern texts respond to errors: are errors things to correct, or to dutifully transcribe? Is the history of the book a story of the gradual elimination of error, or might we propose a more productive role for slips and blunders?

    Proposals for 20-minute papers are welcome on any aspect of error and print, in Anglophone or non-Anglophone cultures. Please email a 300-word abstract and a short CV to Dr Adam Smyth (adam.smyth@balliol.ox.ac.uk) by 14 April 2014.

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    Reading Conference in Early Modern Studies
    7 - 9 July 2014
    The Early Modern Research Centre, University of Reading

    The Reading Early Modern Conference continues to establish itself as the place where early modernists meet each July for stimulation, conversation and debate. As in previous years, proposals of individual papers and panels are invited on research in any aspect of early modern studies relating to Britain, Europe and the wider world. This year, the plenary speakers are Randall McLeod (Toronto) and Tony Claydon (Bangor).

    We would welcome proposals for individual papers and panels on any aspect of early modern literature, history, art, music and culture. Panels have been proposed on the following themes and further panels or individual papers are also invited on these topics or any other aspect of early modern studies:

    Proposals for panels should consist of a minimum of two and a maximum of four papers. Each panel proposal should contain the names of the session chair, the names and affiliations of the speakers and short abstracts (200 word abstracts) of the papers together with email contacts for all participants. A proposal for an individual paper should consist of a 200 word abstract of the paper with brief details of affiliation and career.

    Proposals for either papers or panels should be sent by email to the chair of the Conference Committee, Dr. Rebecca Bullard, by 6 January 2014, r.bullard@reading.ac.uk

    We welcome proposals from postgraduates, and the conference hopes to make some money available for postgraduate bursaries. Anyone for whom some financial assistance is a prerequisite for their attendance should mention this when submitting their proposal.

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    Medieval and Renaissance Lost Libraries (2014 Library & Information History Conference)[New!]
    12 July 2014
    Senate House in London

    The 2014 conference of CILIP’s Library and Information History Group will have the theme 'Medieval and Renaissance Lost Libraries'. It will be held at Senate House in London on Saturday 12 July 2014. The guest speaker is Dr. Raphaële Mouren, Librarian and Deputy Director of the Warburg Institute. A short walking tour, led by Alice Ford-Smith will take place after the conference, but places are limited to 20 people.

    Call for papers
    Papers are welcome on such topics as libraries that have been destroyed either deliberately or accidentally, stolen books and libraries, fractured collections and losses due to weeding policy. Examples may be taken from any country in the world.

    Abstracts of no more than 250 words (for individual 20 minute papers) should be sent to Monica Blake at info@blakeinformation.com by 3 March 2014. Accepted conference papers will be considered for publication in a special issue of the Group’s journal Library & Information History.

    A student bursary is being offered which covers conference fees and refreshments, but not travel expenses. The deadline for the bursary is the 1st of May 2014. Applications can be made by emailing a short paragraph explaining why you would like to attend the conference along with a one page CV to the Chair, Renae Satterley: r.satterley@middletemple.org.uk.

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    The Edition as Argument, 1550-1750
    16 - 17 July 2014
    Queen Mary, University of London

    Keynote Speakers: Professor Cathy Shrank (University of Sheffield) Professor Henry Woudhuysen (Oxford University)

    Confirmed speakers: Kate Bennett, Christopher Burlinson, Dan Carey, David Colclough, Alice Eardley, Nick McDowell, Leah Marcus, Valerie Rumbold; Richard Serjeantson, Gary Stringer

    Call for Papers
    From the philology of Lorenzo Valla to twentieth-century debates over copy-text to the new frontier of digital humanities, textual scholars have always argued over the making of meaning. Indeed, argument is integral to the practice of editing: to privilege one reading is to discard another. Bibliographical, historical, and textual choices: these ineluctably and often invisibly inform our larger understanding of the text, the author, and the culture from which they emerge. They can destabilise or confirm our most basic assumptions, from a single word - what is 'blew'? - to the nature of the book: what is a text? what is an author? what is an edition?

    This landmark two-day conference will draw together experienced and new editors, to analyse and to celebrate editions in progress and to inspire a new generation of editors and editions. Hosted by the AHRC-funded Complete Works of Sir Thomas Browne (forthcoming, OUP), the event will explore the future of editing in universities and offer perspectives from curators and publishers. One direct print outcome will be a handbook on editing sixteenth and seventeenth-century documents.

    We invite proposals for 20-25 minute papers on these and other arguments. Topics might include, but are not limited to:

    Abstracts should be no more than 300 words long and should be sent to Harriet Phillips (h.phillips@qmul.ac.uk) and Claire Bryony Williams (c.b.williams@qmul.ac.uk) by 1st December 2013.

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    Print Networks Conference: Worlds of Learning: Education and the Book Trade
    22 - 23 July 2014
    St. Anne’s College, Oxford

    Keynote speaker: Professor Simon Eliot

    The thirty-second Print Networks Conference on the History of the British book trade will take place at St. Anne’s College, Oxford on 22-23th July 2014.

    The conference will take education and the book trade as its theme. Papers are invited on any aspect of printing, publishing, distribution and bookselling for education, broadly defined, since the beginnings of print until the present. How did the book trade and education mutually profit from and shape each other? What was the book trade's impact on the development of institutions of learning; the organization of knowledge; pedagogies and technologies of instruction; and on both formal and informal education, including self-help? Papers with an interest in the provincial book trades in Britain are particularly welcomed, as this has been the historical theme of the Print Networks series, but so too are papers on the relationship between metropolitan and provincial book cultures, national and transnational print economies, and on interactions between print and other media. Papers will be considered for publication in Publishing History.

    DEADLINE
    An abstract of no more than 400 words of the proposed paper (of 25-30 minutes duration) should be submitted by 31st January 2014 to Giles Bergel via email (giles.bergel@ell.ox.ac.uk) or at the address below: Faculty of English Language and Literature,
    University of Oxford
    Manor Road
    Oxford OX1 3UL
    United Kingdom It is understood that papers offered to the conference will be original work and not delivered to any similar body before presentation at this conference.

    FELLOWSHIP
    The Print Networks Conference offers an annual fellowship to a postgraduate scholar whose research falls within the parameters of the conference brief, and who wishes to present a paper at the conference. The fellowship covers the cost of attending the conference and some assistance towards costs of travel. A summary of the research being undertaken and a recommendation from a tutor or supervisor should also be sent to the above email or postal address by 31st January 2014.

    Accommodation and dining will be available at St. Anne’s College: information on this will be provided along with the conference programme after the closing date for submissions.

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    Forms and Formats: Experimenting with Print, 1695–1815
    8 - 9 September 2014
    University of Oxford

    From broadside ballads and Lilliputian folios to printed engravings and manuals, from newspapers and pamphlets to abridgements and anthologies, a vast variety of print circulated in eighteenth-century Britain and its colonies. How did authors, printers, engravers or booksellers experiment with new forms of publication and with what results? To what extent did regulations related to copyright, taxation, or postal distribution affect the choices of authors and publishers? How did changes in printing format (octavo, duodecimo, etc.) alter the experiences of readers and reveal the modifications of the book trade?

    Papers may examine a specific text or image as it appeared across different formats, or consider a particular category (the monthly magazine, the advertisement, the abridged novel, etc.) in relation to its material form(s). Whether focusing on the evolution of techniques and materials or the changing habits of readers, authors are especially encouraged to include analysis of works held by one of the host libraries-- The Bodleian Library, Jesus College Fellows’ Library, and Oriel College Senior Library. Copies of relevant works will be displayed during the conference.

    Please supply a 300-word proposal and a one-page C.V. by 15 February 2014 (deadline extension) to: formsandformats2014@gmail.com

    Plenary speakers
    To be confirmed. Dr. Christine Ferdinand (Magdalen College, University of Oxford), Pr. James Raven (University of Essex).

    Organised by Centre for the Study of the Book, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/csb
    Centre for Research on the English-Speaking World (CREC/CREW), Université Sorbonne-Nouvelle, Paris 3. http://www.univ-paris3.fr/ea-4399-center-for-research-on-the-english-speaking-world-crew-english-version-99530.kjsp

    Contact Details
    Dr Louisiane Ferlier
    Dr Bénédicte Miyamoto
    Dr Will Slauter

    Email: formsandformats2014@gmail.com

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    SHARP 2014
    17 - 21 September 2014
    Antwerp, Belgium

    The 22nd annual conference of the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading & Publishing (SHARP) will be held in Antwerp (Belgium), Wednesday 17 September through Sunday 21 September 2014. The program takes place primarily at the University of Antwerp, in the old centre of the city, but includes events at different venues of book historical interest as well as preconference workshops/tours and excursions. The central theme is ‘Religions of the Book’, but in conformity with tradition the conference also welcomes other book historical papers, sessions and round tables. Sponsors include the Plantin-Moretus Museum, the Hendrik Conscience Library, the Flemish House of Literature, the Antwerp Bibliophile Society, the Museum of Letters & Manuscripts, KBC Banking & Insurance, the Flemish Book Historical Society and the University of Antwerp.

    Conference theme: Religions of the Book
    Ever since printers such as Gheraert Leeu, Mathias van der Goes and Dirk Martens established businesses in Antwerp at the end of the fifteenth century, the city has been an important typographical centre. The jewel in its crown remains the Museum Plantin-Moretus, recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage site. The only surviving printing office of the Ancien Régime, with its entire infrastructure, archive and library still intact, attracts thousands of visitors each year. But many other printers, publishers, booksellers, librarians, bibliophiles and authors too have left their mark on this vibrant port on the river Scheldt. Moreover, Antwerp continues to be a book centre. It hosts an annual book fair that attracts approximately 200,000 visitors, houses numerous publishing companies and libraries, and invests considerably in its print heritage. Meanwhile thrilling festivals, bright cartoon and poetry murals as well as an officially elected ‘city poet’ add to its lively literary atmosphere. Hence, it was by no means a coincidence that Antwerp was elected World Book Capital by UNESCO in 2004. Moreover, the city is an excellent location to further explore the rich heritage of Belgium with hotspots like Ghent, Louvain, Brussels and Bruges all within an hour’s distance and European cities such as Amsterdam, Paris, London and Cologne hardly any farther (two to three hours by train).

    Next to books, literature and print heritage, religious diversity is an important part of Antwerp’s identity. From the middle of the sixteenth century onwards the city was the scene of ferocious battles between Calvinism and Catholicism in the 16th and 17th century. Jews and Muslims have also been an integral part of Antwerp’s past and both communities are visibly present in the city today. To illustrate the shared heritage of the three ‘religions of the Book’ that left their mark on the city, Antwerp will host a prestigious double exhibition from September 2014 to January 2015. One part will run in the Museum aan de Stroom (MAS) orbiting around ‘Sacred Places and Pilgrimage’, the other will take place in the Hendrik Conscience Library and will focus on ‘Sacred Books’.

    Although SHARP 2014 will kick off this major double exhibition and alludes explicitly to the three ‘religions of the Book’ – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – the actual scope of the conference is much broader and may include the relationship between any religion(s) and the production, distribution and consumption of books and texts, in whatever form (manuscript, printed or digital), in any region or any period of time. Religious and anti-religious censorship, iconography, spiritual literature, preaching practices are only a few of the many possible approaches. Moreover, participants to SHARP’s 22nd annual conference are invited to explore the more metaphorical dimensions of its central topic. We warmly invite proposals relating the theme to bibliophilia (a religion devoted to the book?), cult books, the role of authors as high priests, reading as a trance-provoking practice, the sacral status of the printed book in Enlightenment ideology, the strong belief in the freedom of the press... One may even consider the cultural apocalypse some pessimists see ensue the on-going process of digitization, or, inversely, the imminent salvation promised by internet and tablet gurus. Cutting-edge proposals, dealing with other aspects of book history and print culture are also welcome, but priority will be given to papers addressing the conference theme.

    Deadline and further requirements
    Papers presented at SHARP conferences are expected to offer original scholarship and to go beyond descriptive accounts of archival or textual materials. Speakers should outline the wider implications of research presented. Both the thesis being tested and the conclusions drawn should be clearly stated in the proposal. SHARP prides itself on attracting members from a variety of disciplines, who communicate in a language accessible to diverse specialists. Proposals are to indicate how the paper (or panel) sheds light on some issue, principle, or practice of book history that clearly addresses SHARP’s interests. The conference is open to both individual presentations and complete panel proposals (with three speakers and a chairperson). Each speaker is allotted 20 minutes for the presentation and 10 minutes for discussion. All sessions last 90 minutes. Paper proposals should be no more than 400 words, are submitted in English and accompanied by a brief biography. Panel proposals consist of three individual 400-word proposals, the required biographies and an introduction. The deadline for submissions (both individual proposals and sessions) is 30 November 2013. The program committee will send notifications of its selection no later than 15 February 2014. All participants, including chairs and speakers, must be members of SHARP in order to participate. Registration for the conference is a prerequisite. For information on membership, please visit the SHARP website at www.sharpweb.org.

    Travel grants
    SHARP is able to provide a limited number of travel grants to graduate students and independent scholars. If you wish to be considered for such a grant, please state this when submitting your proposal.

    Conference website: http://www.sharp2014.be/

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    Landmarks in printing: from origins to the digital age
    13 - 14 November 2014
    St Bride Library, London

    In 2014, the Printing Historical Society will commemorate its fiftieth anniversary and its role in the encouragement of printing history. To celebrate this milestone, the Society will host several events, foremost of which is a two-day conference on the theme of 'Landmarks in Printing: from origins to the digital age'.

    The Society invites papers that cover all aspects of the printing arts and industry, including the cultural, practical and technical achievements of the craft. It is anticipated that papers will consider not only the history of the subject, but also its theory and practice and will be drawn from a wide body of speakers that may include printers, graphic designers, typographers, publishers, papermakers, librarians, collectors, booksellers, bookbinders and historians of all relevant fields.

    Papers are welcome from scholars, practitioners or students.

    Applicants should submit a 300-word proposal in Word format, together with a short curriculum vitae.

    All applications and questions to PHS Honorary Secretary, Francis Cave: francis@franciscave.com

    Closing date: 1200-noon, 28 February 2014

    Organising committee: Caroline Archer; Francis Cave; Andrew Dolinski; John Hinks; James M'Kenzie- Hall; Paul W Nash.

    Printing Historical Society http://printinghistoricalsociety.org.uk

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    Community Libraries: Connecting Readers in the Atlantic World, 1650-1850 - Libraries in the Community
    23 - 24 January 2015
    London

    We are delighted to announce the launch of a new AHRC-funded international research network on Community Libraries, which aims to establish a dynamic, interdisciplinary research forum to investigate the role of libraries in shaping communities in the long eighteenth century. Developed by Dr Mark Towsey (University of Liverpool) together with partners at Loyola University Chicago, the Newberry Library, and Dr Williams's Library (London), the Network will explain the emergence of libraries in the 'public sphere' between 1650 and 1850. We will assess the contribution made by libraries to the circulation and reception of print of all kinds, and to the forging of collective identities amongst local, national, and international communities of readers. In addition, the network aims to explore the emergence of libraries in comparative perspective, asking how far models of library provision and administration were disseminated, discussed, imitated, and challenged as they travelled between different social environments and political regimes.

    The Network will organise three two-day colloquia in the UK and the US. Each colloquium will focus on a specific theme, and will feature methodological workshops, work-in-progress presentations, pre-circulated papers, and roundtables.
    Colloquium 1: Libraries in the Atlantic World, to be held in Liverpool on 24-25 January, 2014
    Colloquium 2: Digital Approaches to Library History, to be held in Chicago on 30 May-1 June, 2014
    Colloquium 3: Libraries in the Community, to be held in London on 23-24 January 2015

    Call for proposals
    The project team invites initial expressions of interest from scholars interested in any element of the Community Libraries research programme. If you feel you can make a significant contribution to any or all of our colloquia, please send abstracts of 500 words, together with a brief summary of your research interests and career to date, to the Principal Investigator Dr Mark Towsey (towsey@liverpool.ac.uk) by 1 September 2013. For further information, please visit our website at www.communitylibraries.net.

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    Publish or Perish? Scientific periodicals from 1665 to the present
    19 - 21 March 2015
    The Royal Society, London

    Call for papers
    To celebrate the anniversary of the Philosophical Transactions, the world's oldest scientific journal, the Royal Society will be hosting a major conference in spring 2015. At a time when the future of scientific publishing is in flux, this conference will take the long perspective by examining the transformations and challenges in the publishing of scientific journals over the last three and a half centuries, and into the future. We seek offers of papers, or proposals for three- or four-paper panels, which engage with any aspect of the commercial, editorial and distribution practices of scientific journal publishing, in any period since 1665, preferably with a comparative or longue durée perspective.

    Papers or panels might address:

  • The processes of printing, publishing or illustrating scientific journals
  • The commercial practices of journal publishing
  • The development of editorial and refereeing processes
  • Distribution networks and marketing - regional, national and international
  • Issues concerning the status, reputation and reception of competing journals
  • Offers of papers, including a 250-word abstract, should be sent to publishorperish@royalsociety.org by the 30th of November 2013.

    Participants must be willing and able to prepare their paper for speedy publication in autumn 2015.

    Philosophical Transactions at 350
    The Philosophical Transactions turns 350 on March the 6th, 2015. To celebrate this milestone in the history of science communication, a programme of events and activities is being planned for the Anniversary year. In addition, a major AHRC-funded research project, led by Dr Aileen Fyfe at the University of St Andrews in partnership with the Royal Society, is already under way, which will produce the first full history of the Philosophical Transactions.

    http://www.royalsociety.org
    https://arts.st.andrews.ac.uk/philosophicaltransactions/

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    Book Fairs

    Due to the way that the Provincial Book Fairs Association presents its calendar on its website, it has become too time-consuming to import the data over to HoBo. Consequently, I'm afraid that I won't be including PBFA fair information.

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