E 31/1/3; Domesday entry for Dunwich, c.1085-6 - opens in a new window

 

Prosopography:

Approaches & Applications

jesus college, Oxford, 15-18 july 2005

Organised by the Prosopography Centre of the Modern History Research Unit

(University of Oxford)

Organisers

programme

accommodation

registration

OXFORD

 

 

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

 

You can download the conference programme here: RTF.

 

Social Events

 

Walking Tour of Oxford.

On the first evening of the conference we invite our participants to have a stroll through Oxford, a town vibrating with history. For more information on dreaming spires please click on ‘Oxford’ in the menu bar. The tour is free of charge and will take you through several centuries of Oxford’s history. On demand, we can finish this tour admiring the sunset over Cherwell River in ‘Head of the River’ pub near Foley Bridge, close to Christ Church.

 

Broughton Castle.

Due to the low numbers the trip to Broughton Castle has been cancelled. All participants who have registered for it will be refunded their deposit.

 

Friday 15 July 

 

9.00 – 10.00 Arrival and registration

 

10.00 – 10.15 Opening address, Dr Katharine Keats-Rohan

 

10.15 – 11.00 Professor Timothy Barnes, ‘Prosopography’

 

11.00 – 11.40 Professor Jean-Philippe Genet, ‘Prosopography of authors and readers’

 

11.40 – 12.30 Dr Marietta Horster, ‘The Prosopographia Imperii Romani (PIR) and new projects in Roman prosopography’

 

12.30 – 2.00 Lunch

 

2.00 – 2.40 Dr Dion Smythe, ‘A Whiter Shade of Pale’

 

 2.40 – 3.30 Professor Ralph Mathisen, ‘An Ounce of Prevention: The Creation of Prosopographical Databases’

 

3.45 – 4.00 Tea

 

4.00 – 4.45 Dr Claudia Ludwig, ‘Who is who in the Prosopographie der mittelbyzantinischen Zeit? Problems of identification in the middle Byzantine period’

 

5.30 – 6.30 Walking Tour of Oxford

 

7.00 Dinner

 

Saturday 16 July

 

8.15 – 8.45 Breakfast

 

9.00 – 9.40 Dr Heather Devine, ‘The use of prosopographical methods in Canadian native history’

 

9.40 – 10.20 Professor Luis A. Garcia Moreno, ‘Prosopography and onomastic: the case of the Goths’

 

10.20 – 10.40 Coffee

 

10.45 – 11.30 Giovanni Ruffini, ‘Network analysis and Greco-Roman prosopography’

 

11.30 – 12.15 Dr Karlijn Deene, ‘French composers between the Franco-Prussian (1870-71) and the Japanese-Russian (1904-05) wars: the advantages of a prosopographical research’

 

12.15 – 1.00 Christophe Verbruggen, ‘Literary strategy during Flanders’ golden decades (1880-1914): combining social network analysis and prosopography’

 

1.00 – 2.00 Lunch

 

2.00 – 2.40 Nuno Camarinhas, ‘The Crown’s judges – the judicial profession in ancien regime Portugal’

 

2.40 – 3.20 Dr Borek Neskudla, ‘Prosopography of the Prague universtiy of laws, 1372-1419: a relational database in prosopographical research’

 

3.20 – 3.40 Tea

 

3.45 – 4.30 Dr Steven Taylor, ‘Counting the clergy: the CCEd and the limitations of a prosopographical tool

 

4.30 – 5.15 Dr Andrew Wareham & Ms Artemis Papakostouli, ‘New research tools for a new subject: digital prosopographies and pre-modern global history’

 

7.00 Dinner

 

Sunday 17 July

 

8.15 – 8.45 Breakfast

 

9.00 – 9.30 Professor Kevin Jaques

 

9.30 – 10.00 Najam Haider, ‘To basmalah or not to basmalah: geography and isnad in early Islamic legal traditions’

 

10.10-10.45 Maria Dimitrova, ‘A vizierial household model from the 16th century Ottoman Empire: a prosopographical approach to the Ottoman patronage system’

 

10.45 – 11.00 Coffee

 

11.00 – 11.35 Jared van Duinen, ‘Nature and the expression of ideological dissent in the reign of Charles I’

 

11.35 – 12.00 Dr James G. Crawford, ‘A prosopographical approach to American Empire: US soldiers and the conquest of the Philippines, 1898-1902’

 

12.00 – 12.45 Dr Claire Taylor, ‘The sociology of Athenian democracy’

 

1.00 – 2.00 Lunch

 

2.00 – 4.00 Free Time

 

4.00 Tea

 

4.30 – 5.15 Dr Peter Claus and Charlie Markwick, ‘Webs of significance: using hypertext to connect prosopographical information from the Victorian city of London’

 

5.15 Dr Jeremy Catto, ‘Reflections on the Database of Emden’s Oxford Alumni

 

5.40 Launch of the on-line Manual

 

7.00 Conference Dinner

 

Monday 18 July

 

8.15 – 8.45 Breakfast

 

9.00 – 9.40 Dr Beth Hartland, ‘English landholders in Ireland and their attorneys, c. 1270 – c. 1360: how to proceed?’

 

9.40 – 10.20 Dr Alessandro Nuvolari, ‘ “The ingenious crowd”: the DNB’s “creation” of great British inventors’

 

10.20 – 10.40 Coffee

 

10.45 – 11.30 Professor William D. Rubinstein, ‘Approaches to the study of middle class and elite groups: men and property, the very wealthy in Britain since the industrial revolution’

 

11.30 – 12.15 Carolyn Dougherty, ‘George Stephenson and 19th Century Engineering Networks’

 

12.30 – 1.30 Lunch

 

1.30 – 2.15 Ronald Sluijter, ‘The repertory of office-holders in the Netherlands, 1428-1861’

 

2.15 – 3.00 Jo Rune Ugulen, ‘Medieval prosopography in Norway: where does it stand and where is it going?’

 

3.00 Conclusion

 

 

 

 

Page last updated 29 June 2005.

 

Email: prosop@history.ox.ac.uk