Submissions

 

Call for Papers | Style Sheet

 

 

Call for Papers

 

The Editorial Board is pleased to announce call for papers for the first issue of the Prosopon.

 

The maximum length for a review is 3,000 words and 9,000 words for a paper (excluding footnotes). Articles should be accompanied by an abstract of 250 words and a brief biographical statement.

 

All submissions should be in Times New Roman font (12 pt.) with 2.0 line spacing and generous margins. Please consult The Prosopon Style Sheet [http://users.ox.ac.uk/~prosop/prosopon/style_sheet.htm] before submitting your paper or review.

 

Please send your paper as an e-mail attachment (in rtf format) in addition to (not in lieu of) two hard copies. Please note that illustrations, tables, diagrams and other additional material should be submitted in separate files. The Editors reserve the right to edit your submission if it is accepted for publication.

 

Manuscripts and other correspondence should be sent to the Executive Editor:

 

Dr. David Thornton

Bilkent Ünïversïtesï

Bilkent, Ankara

06533, Turkey

 

prosop@herald.ox.ac.uk

tdavid@bilkent.edu.tr

 

Deadline for the submissions: 15 April 2005. If at all possible, please submit well before the deadline.

 

 

Style Sheet

 

Prosopon follows the ‘style’ of the Modern Humanities Research Association as set out in MHRA Style Guide: A Handbook for Authors, Editors, and Writers of Theses (London, Modern Humanities Research Association, 2002), which can be read online, as a pdf file, on the Association’s web-site:

 

http://www.mhra.org.uk/Publications/Books/StyleGuide/download.shtml

 

This current document is intended only as a ‘basic’ guide to our preferred style for references in footnotes. For a fuller explanation of individual bibliographical points, as well as for certain forms of reference not included here (e.g., articles in newspapers and magazines), please consult the MHRA Style Guide.

 

1. REFERENCES

 

All references to other works should be presented in footnotes, and not in endnotes nor using the author-date system. Footnotes should be numbered usingarabic’ numerals, in a single sequence throughout the article. The first reference to a work should include full bibliographical details – according to the conventions outlined below – and later references should be limited to surname(s) and short title plus page number(s). Avoid using op. cit. and loc. cit., and only use ibid. where no ambiguity may arise.

 

1.A.     BOOKS: MONOGRAPHS AND EDITIONS

 

Joan Greatrex, Bibliographical Register of the English Cathedral Priories of the Province of Canterbury c. 1066-1540 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997).

 

Stephen Wilson, The Means of Naming: A Social and Cultural History of Personal Naming in Western Europe (London: UCL Press, 1998), p. 166.

 

Family Trees and the Roots of Politics: The Prosopography of Britain and France from the Tenth to the Twelfth Century, ed. by K. S. B. Keats-Rohan (Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1997).

 

Prosopography and Computer: Contributions of Medievalists and Modernists on the Use of Computer in Historical Research, ed. by Koen Goudriaan and others (Leuven: Garant, 1995).

 

David Hey and George Redmonds, Yorkshire Surnames and the Hearth Tax Returns of 1672-73, Borthwick Papers, 102 (York: Borthwick Institute of Historical Research, University of York, 2002).

 

Debra Nails, The People of Plato: A Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics (Indianapolis, IN: Hackett , 2002)

 

The Cartulary of Worcester Cathedral (Register I), ed. by R. R. Darlington, Publications of the Pipe Roll Society, n.s. 38 (London: Pipe Roll Society, 1968), pp. 254-55.

 

Ronald Syme, The Roman Revolution, 2nd edn (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1971).

 

Prosopographie et genèse de l’état  moderne: Actes de la table ronde organisée par le Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique et l’École Normale Supérieure de Jeunes Filles, Paris, 22-23 octobre 1984, ed. by Françoise Autrand (Paris: École Normale Supérieure de Jeunes Filles, 1986).

 

Christoph W. Clairmont, Classical Attic Tombstones, 8 vols (Kilchberg, Switzerland: Akanthus, 1993), III, 24.

 

Standish Hayes O’Grady and Robin Flower, Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in the British Library [Formerly British Museum], 2 vols (London: British Museum, 1926; repr. Dublin: School of Celtic Studies, 1992), II, p. xi.

 

1.B.     CHAPTERS OR ARTICLES IN BOOKS

 

George Beech, ‘Prosopography’, in Medieval Studies: An Introduction, ed. by James M. Powell (Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 1992), pp. 185-226.

 

Alan V. Murray, ‘The Prosopography aand Onomastics of the Franks in the Kingdom of Jerusalem, 1099-1187’, in Onomastique et Parenté dans l’Occident medieval, ed. by K. S. B. Keats-Rohan and C. Settipani, Prosopographica et Genealogica, 2 (Oxford: Unit for Prosopographical Research, 2000), pp. 284-94 (p. 293).

 

Ian Winchester, ‘A brief survey of the algorithmic, mathematical and philosophical literature relevant to historical record linkage’, in Identifying People in the Past, ed. by E. A. Wrigley (London: Edward Arnold, 1973), pp. 128-50 (pp. 130-31).

 

Gillian Fellows-Jenson, ‘Personal Names, Scandinavian’, in The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England, ed. by Michael Lapidge and others (Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1999), pp. 364-65.

 

1.C.     ARTICLES IN JOURNALS

 

Janet L. Nelson, David A. E Pelteret, and Harold Short, ‘Medieval Prosopographies and the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England’, Proceedings of the British Academy, 118 (2003), 155-67.

 

Patricia Skinner, ‘“And Her Names Was…?” Gender and Naming in Medieval Southern Italy’, Medieval Prosopography: History and Collective Biography, 20 (1999), 23-49 (p. 24).

 

Jack Goody, ‘Sideways or Downwards? Lateral and Vertical Succession, Inheritance and Descent in Africa and Eurasia’, Man: The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, n.s. 5 (1970), 627‑38.

 

Ann Williams, ‘Lost Worlds: Kentish Society in the Eleventh Century’, Medieval Prosopography: History and Collective Biography, 20 (1999), 51-74 (pp. 53-55).

 

Peter C. Bartrum,  Disgyniad Pendefigaeth Cymru (Descent of the Sovereignty of Wales)’, National Library of Wales Journal, 16 (1969-70), 253‑63 (pp. 261-62).

 

André Chastagnol, ‘La prosopographie méthode de recherche sur l’histoire du Bas-Empire’, Annales Économies Sociétés Civilisations, 25 (1970), 1229-35 (pp. 1231-32).

 

1.D.     MANUSCRIPTS

 

British Library, Harley Charter 43.C.13

 

National Archives [formerly Public Record Office], E327/431

 

Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare Birthplace Trust, MS ER1/65/401

 

Worcestershire Record Office, MS b.716:093-BA.2648/6(iii), p. 131

 

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Dugdale 21, fol. 143v

 

Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Dugdale 21, fols 143v-44r

 

1.E.     ELECTRONIC RESOURCES

 

Online Publications

David A. E. Pelteret and Alex Burghart, ‘Describing Events in Database Terms: An English Charter of AD 804’ in Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England <http://www.kcl.ac.uk/humanities/cch/pase/drh02-pase-Cenwulf.htm> [accessed 23 June 2004].

 

CD-ROMS

Katharine S. Keats-Rohan, The Continental Origins of English Landowners, 1066-1166 (2002) [on CD-ROM].

 

1.F.     ABBREVIATIONS

 

The use of abbreviated titles should be limited, following list of common reference works such as OED, PLRE, DNB and others.

 

2. DOCUMENT FORMAT

 

The maximum length is 3,000 words for a review and 9,000 words for a paper (excluding footnotes). Articles should be accompanied by an abstract of 250 words and a brief biographical statement. All submissions should be in Times New Roman font (12 pt.) with 2.0 line spacing and generous margins.

 

3. SPELLING

 

Spelling should conform to The Oxford Dictionary for Writers and Editors.

 

4. COPYRIGHT

 

All works are copyright of the author. Contributors bear sole responsibility for statements of fact or opinion and general content of their works, which in no way reflects views or opinions of the Editors, Prosopography Centre or the University of Oxford.

 

Contributors are responsible for obtaining copyright permissions to reproduce copyright images or other material in their papers. Copies of permission letters may be requested prior to the publication with the Prosopon.

 

5. SUBMISSION

 

Please send your paper as an e-mail attachment (in rtf format) in addition to (not in lieu of) two hard copies. Please note that illustrations, tables, diagrams and other additional material should be submitted in separate files. The Editors reserve the right to edit your submission if it is accepted for publication.

 

Manuscripts and other correspondence should be sent to the Executive Editor:

 

Dr. David Thornton

Bilkent Ünïversïtesï

Bilkent, Ankara

06533, Turkey

 

prosop@herald.ox.ac.uk

tdavid@bilkent.edu.tr