Posters & Demos and more

Dr Titus von der Malsburg


Position:

Research Associate
St John's College
University of Oxford
Portrait of Titus von der Malsburg
Email: malsburg@posteo.de
titus.vondermalsburg@sjc.ox.ac.uk
Address:   St John's College
Research Centre
St Giles'
Oxford OX1 3JP
Profiles: Research Gate
Github
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PGP key: click here

News

  • Christoph Illing started his artist residency at the Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe where he implements our audification of brain activity on the Klangdom.
  • Our paper about factors shaping scanpaths in reading was accepted for publication in the Cognitive Science Journal.
  • Paul, Shravan, Frank, and I have two presentations about co-registration of eye movements and brain potentials at CUNY 2014, one poster, one talk. See here and here for details.
  • I started my new job in Kate Nation's lab in Oxford.

About

My research interest is in the area of human language comprehension. Specifically, I'm interested in the mechanisms establishing the grammatical relations between the words in a sentence. To study these mechanisms, I develop advanced experimental and analytical methods. One of these methods allows the quantitative analysis of spatio-temporal patterns in eye movements, a.k.a. scanpaths (von der Malsburg & Vasishth, 2011). Using this method, I investigate reading strategies in garden-path sentences and inter-individual differences in how these strategies are deployed (von der Malsburg & Vasishth, 2012). Another new method that I'm working on is the simultaneous recording of eye movements and electrical brain potentials. Together with my colleagues, I use this technique to study the processes underlying the resolution of anaphoric expressions and argument-head dependencies.

Education

  • Dr. phil. in cognitive science, 2012, University of Potsdam (grade: summa cum laude)
    Thesis: Scanpath phenomena in reading – An investigation of scanpath effects in syntactic ambiguity resolution and in general reading
    Supervisors: Shravan Vasishth, Reinhold Kliegl
  • B.A., computational linguistics, 2005, University of Tübingen (grade: very good)
    Thesis: Development of a natural language command shell
    Supervisor: Frank Richter

Manuscripts

Metzner, P., von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2014b). Oscillatory brain correlates of world-knowledge violations in natural reading. [ bib ]

Metzner, P., von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2014a). Covert versus overt recovery in reading: Evidence from eye movements and brain responses. [ bib ]

Metzner, P., von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2014c). Responses to syntactic and semantic violations: Evidence from concurrent eye movement and eeg recordings. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T., Metzner, P., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2013). Investigating anaphoric dependencies using coregistration of eye movements and event-related brain potentials. [ bib ]

Articles

von der Malsburg, T., Kliegl, R., and Vasishth, S. (2014). Determinants of scanpath regularity in reading. Cognitive Science. [ bib ]

Scanpaths have played an important role in classic research on reading behavior. Nevertheless, they have largely been neglected in later research—perhaps also due to a lack of suitable analytical tools. Recently, von der Malsburg and Vasishth (2011) proposed a new measure for quantifying differences between scanpaths and demonstrated that this measure can recover effects that were missed with the traditional eyetracking measures. However, the sentences used in that study were difficult to process and scanpath effects accordingly strong. The purpose of the present study was to test the validity, sensitivity, and scope of applicability of the scanpath measure using simple sentences that are typically read straight from left to right. We derived predictions for the regularity of scanpaths from the literature on oculomotor control, sentences processing, and cognitive aging and tested these predictions using the scanpath measure and a large database of eye movements (N=230). All predictions were confirmed: sentences with short words and syntactically more difficult sentences elicited more irregular scanpaths. Also, older readers produced more irregular scanpaths than younger readers. In addition, we found an effect that was not reported earlier: syntax had a smaller influence on the eye movements of older readers than on those of young readers. We discuss this interaction of syntactic parsing cost with age in terms of shifts in processing strategies and a decline of executive control as readers age. Overall, our results demonstrate the validity and sensitivity of the scanpath measure and thus establish it as a productive and versatile tool for reading research.

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2013). Scanpaths reveal syntactic underspecification and reanalysis strategies. Language and Cognitive Processes, 28(10):1545-1578. [ bib | DOI | http ]

What theories best characterize the parsing processes triggered upon encountering ambiguity, and what effects do these processes have on eye movement patterns in reading? The present eye-tracking study, which investigated processing of attachment ambiguities of an adjunct in Spanish, suggests that readers sometimes underspecify attachment to save memory resources, consistent with the good-enough account of parsing. Our results confirm a surprising prediction of the good-enough account: high-capacity readers commit to an attachment decision more often than low-capacity participants, leading to more errors and a greater need to reanalyze in garden-path sentences. These results emerged only when we separated functionally different types of regressive eye movements using a scanpath analysis; conventional eye-tracking measures alone would have led to different conclusions. The scanpath analysis also showed that rereading was the dominant strategy for recovering from garden-pathing. Our results may also have broader implications for models of reading processes: reanalysis effects in eye movements occurred late, which suggests that the coupling of oculo-motor control and the parser may not always be as tight as assumed in current computational models of eye movements control in reading.

Vasishth, S., von der Malsburg, T., and Engelmann, F. (2013). What eye movements can tell us about sentence comprehension. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science, 4(2):125-134. [ bib | DOI | http ]

Eye movement data have proven to be very useful for investigating human sentence processing. Eyetracking research has addressed a wide range of questions, such as recovery mechanisms following garden-pathing, the timing of processes driving comprehension, the role of anticipation and expectation in parsing, the role of semantic, pragmatic, and prosodic information, and so on. However, there are some limitations regarding the inferences that can be made on the basis of eye movements. One relates to the nontrivial interaction between parsing and the eye movement control system which complicates the interpretation of eye movement data. Detailed computational models that integrate parsing with eye movement control theories have the potential to unpack the complexity of eye movement data and can therefore aid in the interpretation of eye movements. Another limitation is the difficulty of capturing spatiotemporal patterns in eye movements using the traditional word-based eyetracking measures. Recent research has demonstrated the relevance of these patterns and has shown how they can be analyzed. In this review, we focus on reading, and present examples demonstrating how eye movement data reveal what events unfold when the parser runs into difficulty, and how the parsing system interacts with eye movement control. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:125–134. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1209For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

Marusch, T., von der Malsburg, T., Bastiaanse, R., and Burchert, F. (2013). Tempusmorphologie bei deutschen Agrammatikern: Die Sprachproduktion von regulären, irregulären und gemischten Verben. volume 6, pages 219-223. [ bib ]

Seit langem wird debattiert, wie reguläre und irreguläre Vergangenheitsformen repräsentiert und verarbeitet werden (Rumelhart & McClelland, 1986; Pinker & Prince, 1988). Das Dual- Mechanism-Modell (DMM; Pinker & Prince, 1988; Clahsen, 1999) nimmt an, dass reguläre und irreguläre Formen von zwei verschiedenen Mechanismen verarbeitet werden. Vertreter des Single-Mechanism Ansatzes gehen alternativ von einem einzigen Mechanismus aus, der sowohl der Verarbeitung von regulären als auch irregulären Verben dient.

Marusch, T., von der Malsburg, T., Bastiaanse, R., and Burchert, F. (2012). Tense morphology in german agrammatism: The production of regular, irregular and mixed verbs. The Mental Lexicon, 7(3):351-380. [ bib | DOI ]

This study investigates tense morphology in agrammatic aphasia and the predictions of two accounts on processing of regular and irregular verbs: the Dual Mechanism model, that is, for aphasic data, the Declarative/Procedural model, and the Single Mechanism approach. The production of regular, irregular and mixed verbs in the present, simple past and past participle (present perfect) was tested in German by means of a sentence completion task with a group of seven speakers with agrammatic aphasia. The results show a difference between regular verbs and irregular verbs. Mixed verbs were equally difficult as irregular verbs. A frequency effect was found for irregular verbs but not for regular and mixed verbs. A significant difference among the correctness scores for present tense and simple past forms was found. Simple past and past participle were significantly more difficult than present tense. Error types were characterized by pure infinitive responses and time reference errors. Neither of the above accounts is sufficient to explain these results. Correctness scores and error patterns for mixed verbs suggest that such minor lexical patterns can be useful in finding new evidence in the debate on morphological processing. The findings also highlight time reference as well as language specific characteristics need to be taken into consideration.

von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Kliegl, R. (2012). Scanpaths in reading are informative about sentence processing. In Michael Carl, P. B. and Choudhary, K. K., editors, Proceedings of the First Workshop on Eye-tracking and Natural Language Processing, pages 37-53, Mumbai, India. The COLING 2012 organizing committee. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2011). What is the scanpath signature of syntactic reanalysis? Journal of Memory and Language, 65(2):109-127. [ bib | DOI ]

Which repair strategy does the language system deploy when it gets garden-pathed, and what can regressive eye movements in reading tell us about reanalysis strategies? Several influential eye-tracking studies on syntactic reanalysis (Frazier & Rayner, 1982; Meseguer,Carreiras, & Clifton, 2002; Mitchell, Shen, Green, & Hodgson, 2008) have addressed this question by examining scanpaths, i.e., sequential patterns of eye fixations. However, in the absence of a suitable method for analyzing scanpaths, these studies relied on simplified dependent measures that are arguably ambiguous and hard to interpret. We address the theoretical question of repair strategy by developing a new method that quantifies scanpath similarity. Our method reveals several distinct fixation strategies associated with reanalysis that went undetected in a previously published data set (Meseguer et al., 2002). One prevalent pattern suggests re-parsing of the sentence, a strategy that has been discussed in the literature (Frazier & Rayner, 1982); however, readers differed tremendously in how they orchestrated the various fixation strategies. Our results suggest that the human parsing system non-deterministically adopts different strategies when confronted with the disambiguating material in garden-path sentences.

von der Malsburg, T., Baumann, T., and Schlangen, D. (2009). Telida: A package for manipulation and visualization of timed linguistic data. In Proceedings of the SIGDIAL 2009 Conference: The 10th Annual Meeting of the Special Interest Group on Discourse and Dialogue, pages 302-305, London, UK. Association for Computational Linguistics. [ bib | .pdf ]

Conference talks

Metzner, P., von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2014). The relationship between regressive saccades and the p600 effect: Evidence from concurrent eye movement and eeg recordings. In Proceedings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, Columbus, OH, USA. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Kliegl, R. (2013). Scanpaths in reading are tractable and informative. In Holmqvist, K., Mulvey, F., and Johansson, R., editors, Book of abstracts of the 17th European Conference on Eye Movements, page 132, Lund, Sweden. Journal of Eye Movement Research. [ bib ]

Pioneering work in reading research has shown that scanpaths in reading can be informative about sentences processing (Frazier, Rayner, 1982). Nevertheless, scanpaths have not gained much traction in reading research. One reason for that may have been a lack of suitable analytical tools. Here, we summarize three recent studies in which we used a new scanpath measure to analyze gaze data from two experimental studies (von der Malsburg, Vasishth, 2011, 2012) and one corpus study (von der Malsburg, Kliegl, Vasishth, under revision). The experiments investigated how readers process temporarily ambiguous sentences. We showed that readers do not always commit to one of the alternative interpretations, and that readers with low working-memory capacity do so less often. Contrary to what was reported earlier, we found that reparsing instead of targeted repair is a common strategy to recover from incorrect interpretations. Interestingly, these results did not emerge in an analysis using traditional word-based eyetracking measures showing their limitations. In the corpus study, we demonstrated how syntax, oculomotor constraints, and age of reader jointly determine the regularity of scanpaths. We argue that, taken together, these results establish the scanpath as an informative and tractable object of investigation in reading research.

Metzner, P., von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2013a). Oscillatory brain dynamics differ between natural reading and serial presentation. In Holmqvist, K., Mulvey, F., and Johansson, R., editors, Book of abstracts of the 17th European Conference on Eye Movements, page 187, Lund, Sweden. Journal of Eye Movement Research. [ bib ]

Recent research (Dimigen et al., JEP:G, 2011; Kretzschmar et al., NeuroReport, 2009) shows that fixation-related potentials (FRPs) yield similar results as brain potentials recorded during rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). We conducted an experiment to see if this correspondence also holds for oscillatory brain dynamics. Participants (N=48) read true ("The Thames flows through London") and false factual statements ("The Hudson flows through London"). Such violations are known to elicit an N400, a negative-going deflection with a peak around 400 ms, and increased theta and gamma activity (Hagoort, Science, 2004). As expected, we see an N400 in the FRP and increased fixation durations and regression rates in the eye movement record. Moreover, a cluster-permutation test (Maris & Oostenveld, J Neurosci Methods, 2007) for fixation-related power spectra shows synchronization in the delta range (1-3 Hz) and desynchronization in the upper alpha range (11-13 Hz) but no theta or gamma effects. This is at odds with prior findings and suggests that fixation-related oscillatory EEG changes are not fully comparable to those observed in RSVP. One reason for the diverging results may lie in different processing demands: In RSVP, readers must retrieve earlier parts of the sentence from memory because they cannot make regressions.

Metzner, P., von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2013b). World-knowledge violations elicit different rhythmic brain activity in natural reading and serial presentation. In Frenck-Mestre, C., Alario, F.-X., Nguyen, N., Blache, P., and Meunier, C., editors, Proceedings of the Conference on Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing, Marseilles, France. Aix-Marseille Université. [ bib ]

Recent studies (Dimigen et al., JEP:G, 2011; Kretzschmar et al., NeuroReport, 2009) demonstrated the feasibility of investigating fixation-related potentials (FRPs) and that the results are similar to brain potentials recorded during rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). We conducted an experiment to assess if this correspondence also holds for rhythmic brain activity. To pit our results against ults gained with RSVP, the experiment used sentences that are known to produce reliable effects both in the time domain and in the frequency domain (Hagoort, Science, 2004). Participants (N=48) read freely through true ('The Thames flows through London') and false statements ('The Hudson flows through London'). Hagoort et al. report an N400, a negative-going deflection in the ERP with a peak around 400 ms, as well as increased theta (4-7 Hz) and gamma (30-70 Hz) activity. During our experiment, participants' eye movements were monitored and their EEG was recorded from 32 electrodes and later evaluated contingent to the first fixation on the critical word. We analyzed the canonical eye-tracking measures with linear mixed-effects models and the EEG with cluster-permutation tests (Maris & Oostenveld, J Neurosci Methods, 2007) to control for multiple comparisons. As expected, we observed a negativity in the FRP with a centro-parietal distribution and a peak latency of approximately 400 ms. Also as expected, this N400 lined up with increased first fixation durations, gaze durations, and regression rates in the eye movement record (Dambacher & Kliegl, Brain Res, 2007). Crucially, fixation-related power spectra showed synchronization in the delta range (1-3 Hz) at central electrodes and desynchronization in the upper alpha range (11-13 Hz) at occipito-parietal sites relative to a pre-fixation baseline. None of these effects is reported by Hagoort et al. which suggests that fixation-related EEG changes are at least not fully comparable to those observed in RSVP. One reason for the diverging results could lie in different processing demands: In RSVP, readers must retrieve earlier parts of the sentence from working memory because they cannot make regressions. Increased theta activity reflects this more effortful memory access (Klimesch, Brain Res Rev, 1999). In natural reading, readers can easily move their eyes back to resolve the processing difficulty which facilitates memory access. Our findings question the comparability of results acquired with serial presentation vs. natural reading.

Paape, D., Vasishth, S., and von der Malsburg, T. (2013). Local coherence and digging-in effects in german. In Proceedings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page 199, Columbia, SC, USA. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T., Vasishth, S., and Kliegl, R. (2012). Scanpaths in reading are informative about sentence processing. In Michael Carl, P. B. and Choudhary, K. K., editors, Proceedings of the First Workshop on Eye-tracking and Natural Language Processing, pages 37-53, Mumbai, India. The COLING 2012 organizing committee. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2011). Strategies for dealing with attachment ambiguities in Spanish. In Proceedings of the 10th Symposium of Psycholinguistics, San Sebastián, Spain. Basque Center on Cognition, Brain and Language. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2010). Reanalysis strategies in temporarily ambiguous sentence - a scanpath analysis. In Processings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page 32, New York City, NY. NYU. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2009). Individual differences in scanpaths and reanalysis strategies while reading temporarily ambiguous sentences. In Proceedings of the European Conference on Eye Movements, South Hampton, UK. [ bib | .pdf ]

Invited talks

May 2014
Department of Psychology, Bournemouth University
March 2014
Centre for Vision and Cognition (CVC), University of Southampton
January 2014
Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen
October 2013
International Symposium Developmental on Eyetracking Research in Reading, Hannover
March 2013
Center for Interdisciplinary Research, Bielefeld
May 2010
Erasmus Mundus Masters Program in Clinical Linguistics, University of Potsdam
March 2010
Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
May 2009
Erasmus Mundus Masters Program in Clinical Linguistics, University of Potsdam

Posters & Demos

von der Malsburg, T., Metzner, P., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2014). Using co-registration of eye movements and event-related brain potentials to study the processing of anaphoric dependencies. In Proceedings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, Columbus, OH, USA. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Illing, C. (2013). Decomposing electric brain potentials for audification on a matrix of speakers. In Verdicchio, M. and Carvalhais, M., editors, Proceedings of the first conference on Computation, Communication, Aesthetics and X, pages 305-307, Bergamo, Italy. The xCoAx 2013 organizing committee. Demonstration of a sound installation. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T., Metzner, P., Vasishth, S., and Rösler, F. (2013). Co-registration of eye movements and brain potentials as a tool for research on reading and language comprehension. In Holmqvist, K., Mulvey, F., and Johansson, R., editors, Book of abstracts of the 17th European Conference on Eye Movements, page 462, Lund, Sweden. Journal of Eye Movement Research. [ bib ]

Recent research demonstrated the feasibility of analyzing fixation-related brain potentials (FRPs) recorded during natural reading (Kretzschmar et al., 2009; Dimigen et al., 2011). Two questions arise from these studies: (1) Are effects observed with fixation-triggered EEG signals comparable to those observed in standard RSVP designs? (2) Does the combined analysis of EEG and fixation data provide additional insights into reading and comprehension processes that are not available with either method alone? Both above-mentioned studies used material known to robustly elicit strong N400 effects. The present study (N=50) examined responses to a more subtle manipulation representative of common experimental designs: we manipulated the distance between anaphoric expressions (pronouns, verb ellipsis) and their antecedents. Differences were examined using a non-parametric Monte Carlo test (Maris & Oostenveld, 2007). Increased distance of the antecedent elicited an early frontocentral negativity in response to verb ellipses (88ms-134ms, p<0.001) and a negativity at frontocentral and parietal electrodes on the words following pronouns (98ms-186ms, p<0.001). We discuss these results in the context of earlier findings and argue that adopting FRP-methodology requires factoring in complex visuomotor contingencies that are not yet fully understood and that evoke ERP effects different from those seen in RSVP designs.

Kobele, G., Lagrou, E., Engelmann, F., von der Malsburg, T., Musa, R., Gerth, S., van de Vijver, R., and Hale, J. (2012). Incremental processing difficulty in cross-serial and nested verb cluster. In Proceedings of the Conference on Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing, page 150, Trento, Italy. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T., Kliegl, R., and Vasishth, S. (2012). Determinants of scanpath regularity in reading. In Proceedings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page 82, New York City, NY, USA. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T., Kliegl, R., and Vasishth, S. (2011). A scanpath measure reveals effects of age of reader and syntactic complexity of sentences. In Proceedings of the European Conference on Eye Movements, page 254, Marseilles, France. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2011). Eye-movement strategies for dealing with garden-path sentences. In Processings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, pages 205-206, Stanford, CA. Stanford University. [ bib ]

Vasishth, S., Drenhaus, H., and von der Malsburg, T. (2010). Integration difficulty and expectation-based syntactic comprehension. In Processings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page 111, New York City, NY. NYU. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2009b). Readers use different strategies to recover from garden-paths. In Processings of the Summer School on Embodied Language Games and Construction Grammar, Cortona, Italy. Evolutionary Linguistics Association. [ bib ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2009a). Analyzing spatio-temporal patterns in eye movements: A method and software. In Processings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, Davis, CA. UC Davis. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T. (2009). Choice of saccade detection algorithm has a considerable impact on eye tracking measures. In Proceedings of the European Conference on Eye Movements, South Hampton, UK. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2008). A new method for analyzing eye movements in reading that is sensitive to spatial and temporal patterns in sequences of fixations. In Processings of the CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing, page 118, Chapel Hill, NC. UNC at Chapel Hill. [ bib | .pdf ]

von der Malsburg, T. and Vasishth, S. (2007). A time-sensitive similarity measure for scanpaths. In Proceedings of the European Conference on Eye Movements, Potsdam, Germany. [ bib | .pdf ]

Teaching

2013
Advanced topics in psycholinguistics
2011
Statistics in R
2007
Empirical methods in linguistics (tutorial)
2006
Introduction to formal semantics (tutorial)
2003
Logic programming in PROLOG
2002
Introduction to practical computer science
Introduction to statistics (tutorial)
2001
Introduction to practical computer science
Programming in Java (tutorial)
2000
Programming in C, advanced (tutorial)
Introduction to practical computer science
Programming in C, beginners (tutorial)

Reviewing

  • Association for Computational Linguistics
  • Cognitive Science Society
  • French National Research Agency (ANR)
  • International Journal of Human-Computer Studies
  • Journal of Experimental Psychology: General
  • Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition
  • Memory & Cognition
  • Topics in Cognitive Science
  • US National Science Foundation (NSF)

Advising

2013

  • Carla Keßler, PhD thesis, general linguistics, University of Potsdam, co-advised with Shravan Vasishth
  • Nora Kovacs, master's thesis, European master in clinical linguistics, University of Potsdam, co-advised with Shravan Vasishth
  • Ehud Avner, diploma thesis, compuational linguistics, University of Potsdam, co-advised with Manfred Stede
  • Dario Paape, master's thesis, general linguistics, University of Potsdam, co-advised with Shravan Vasishth

Software

Scasim

Tools for analyzing and visualizing spatio-temporal patterns in scanpaths. Implementation of our similarity measure for scanpaths. See our paper in JML for more details (Malsburg & Vasishth, 2011).

Figure showing clustered scanpaths

Saccades

Detection of saccades and fixations in raw eyetracking data.

There are several algorithms for the detection of fixations and saccades in eyetracking data. The available algorithms differ in efficiency (data sets are typically large), robustness, and artifacts they generate. One very elegant and robust algorithm was proposed by Ralf Engbert and Reinhold Kliegl in a paper with the title "Microsaccades uncover the orientation of covert attention" (2003). Here, I provide an implementation of this algorithm as a package for the GNU-R system. I reported a comparison of this algorithm with a commercial product on a ECEM poster (Malsburg, 2009).

TEDview

A program for visualizing discrete temporal data.

Figure showing screenshot of TEDview

TEDview is a software that I developed in the project InPro. It's purpose is to visualize the time-course of events taking place in the incremental and modular dialogue processing system that is being developed there. TEDview uses channels for displaying different sources of mostly linguistic information such as the syntactic hypotheses derived by the parser on a moment by moment basis. However, the design of TEDview is very general and it can be used for visualizing almost any kind of discrete temporal data (log files, eye movements, rule-firing in cognitive models, etc.). TEDview is efficient, i.e. it can display many thousands of objects smoothly, and flexible, i.e. it can easily be extended to display new kinds of data. See Malsburg, Baumann, Schlangen (2009) for details.