Translate into Portuguese:

Intelligent life on a planet comes of age when it first works out the reason for its own existence. If superior creatures from space ever visit earth, the first question they will ask, in order to assess the level of our civilization, is: 'Have they discovered evolution yet?'. Living organisms had existed on earth, without ever knowing why, for over three thousand million years before the truth finally dawned on one of them. His name was Charles Darwin. To be fair, others had had inklings if the truth, but it was Darwin who first put together a coherent and tenable account of why we exist. We no longer have to resort to superstition when faced with the deep problems: Is there a meaning to life? What are we for? What is man? After posing the last of these questions, the eminent zoologist G. G. Simpson put it thus: 'The point I want to make now is that all attempts to answer that question before 1859 are worthless and that we will be better off if we ignore them completely.'
Today the theory of evolution is about as much open to doubt as the theory that the earth goes round the sun, but the full implications of Darwin's revolution have still to be realized. Zoology is still a minority subject in Universities, and even those who choose to study it often make their decision without appreciating its profound philosophical significance. Philosophy and the subjects known as the 'humanities' are still taught almost as if Darwin had never lived.

(Richard Dawkins)